Ki-44 ‘Tojo’ Aces of World War 2 Nicholas Millman 2011-10-18 The 100th title of Osprey's celebrated Aircraft of the Aces series covers a subject sure to be of interest to historians of World War II. The Ki-44 'Tojo' was a fast-climbing, heavily armed point-defence interceptor that was used successfully in slashing hit-and-run tactics that caught Allied pilots by surprise. In the air defense role 'Tojos' pioneered the deployment of a unique 40 mm cannon, the firing system which had no cartridges but instead had the propelling charge contained in the base of the projectile. The Ki-44 was to be used by the JAAF in larger numbers in China than anywhere else. This exciting title from author Nicholas Millman brings the Ki-44's role in the Pacific theatre to vivid life, accompanied by full color plates and archival photographs.
Aircraft of World War II Stewart Wilson 1998 A comprehensive directory of the aircraft that saw service during WWII, with over 300 entries covering the fighters, bombers, reconnaissance and strike aircraft, trainers and transports built in some 15 nations around the world. Entries list: country of origin; aircraft type; powerplants; dimensions; weights; armament; performance; operators; production; and history of each featured aircraft. Sftbd., 8 1/2"x 11", 176 pgs., 322 bandw ill.
Bounty Hunter 4/3 Jason Delgado 2017-10-03 The memoir of Jason Delgado, a US Marine scout sniper and MARSOC's first lead sniper instructor. The fight for Jason Delgado's life and soul began when he was just a boy. He ultimately escaped the death and drugs of a crime-riddled Bronx by way of the United States Marine Corps. However, after earning his way into the esteemed ranks of the service's famed Scout Snipers, Delgado saw that old struggle reignited when he was dumped into the hell of war in Iraq. There Delgado proved not only a participant, but a warrior capable of turning the tide in several of the most harrowing and historically important battles of the evolving war. He took all the hard lessons learned in combat and, as MARSOC's original lead sniper instructor, made himself a pivotal figure in revolutionizing the way special operations snipers trained and operated. But even after accomplishing his mission in the military, Delgado still faced that original fight, struggling to understand and accept the man his experiences had transformed him into. Bounty Hunter 4/3 is Jason Delgado's captivating first-hand account of these powerful and life-changing experiences.
The Encyclopedia of Weapons of World War II Chris Bishop 2002 The encyclopedia of weapns of world war II is the most detailed and authoritative compendium of the weapons of mankind's greatesst conflict ever published. It is a must for the military, enthusiast, and all those interested in World War II.
China's Wings Gregory Crouch 2012-02-28 From the acclaimed author of Enduring Patagonia comes a dazzling tale of aerial adventure set against the roiling backdrop of war in Asia. The incredible real-life saga of the flying band of brothers who opened the skies over China in the years leading up to World War II—and boldly safeguarded them during that conflict—China’s Wings is one of the most exhilarating untold chapters in the annals of flight. At the center of the maelstrom is the book’s courtly, laconic protagonist, American aviation executive William Langhorne Bond. In search of adventure, he arrives in Nationalist China in 1931, charged with turning around the turbulent nation’s flagging airline business, the China National Aviation Corporation (CNAC). The mission will take him to the wild and lawless frontiers of commercial aviation: into cockpits with daredevil pilots flying—sometimes literally—on a wing and a prayer; into the dangerous maze of Chinese politics, where scheming warlords and volatile military officers jockey for advantage; and into the boardrooms, backrooms, and corridors of power inhabited by such outsized figures as Generalissimo and Madame Chiang Kai-shek; President Franklin Delano Roosevelt; foreign minister T. V. Soong; Generals Arnold, Stilwell, and Marshall; and legendary Pan American Airways founder Juan Trippe. With the outbreak of full-scale war in 1941, Bond and CNAC are transformed from uneasy spectators to active participants in the struggle against Axis imperialism. Drawing on meticulous research, primary sources, and extensive personal interviews with participants, Gregory Crouch offers harrowing accounts of brutal bombing runs and heroic evacuations, as the fight to keep one airline flying becomes part of the larger struggle for China’s survival. He plunges us into a world of perilous night flights, emergency water landings, and the constant threat of predatory Japanese warplanes. When Japanese forces capture Burma and blockade China’s only overland supply route, Bond and his pilots must battle shortages of airplanes, personnel, and spare parts to airlift supplies over an untried five-hundred-mile-long aerial gauntlet high above the Himalayas—the infamous “Hump”—pioneering one of the most celebrated endeavors in aviation history. A hero’s-eye view of history in the grand tradition of Lynne Olson’s Citizens of London, China’s Wings takes readers on a mesmerizing journey to a time and place that reshaped the modern world.
Zero Fighter Martin Caidin 1970 The agile, brilliant fighter planes and their masterly pilots blasted all oppositions from the air. The '... weren't just good--they were hell on wheels'. For a fatally long time the horrifying reports came in and were disbelieved. For that space zero fighter ruled the Pacific sky.
West Caroline Islands United States. Office of the Chief of Naval Operations 1944
Flying Through Time Jim Doyle 2005-12-31 Imagine what it would be like to talk and fly with the men who flew the airplanes of World War II. What was in their minds as they made their first solos? And what was air combat like? Flying Through Time is the closest many of us will come to understanding what it was like to be a WWII aviator.Tens of thousands of AmericaOCOs pilots during World War II trained in the Boeing Stearman biplane. For most, it was their first airplane in a series of larger, faster, and more dangerous aircraft that they used to fight the war. The pilots would never forget their first flights in a Stearman and the adventures that followed. Jim Doyle, owner of a restored 1941 Stearman, retraced the wartime journeys of his plane, crossing the country twice; flying over California, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Arkansas; and touching down at each of the eight bases at which it served. Flying Through Time is the story of DoyleOCOs challenging flight and of the uncertainties of piloting a sixty-year-old biplane almost 8,000 miles. His experiences meeting, talking, and flying with the men who flew the legendary Stearman paint a vivid picture of the intense, emotion-filled days of World War II. The pilotsOCO recollections, refreshed for many when they took the controls of DoyleOCOs plane, are woven throughout the narrative of his trip. These anecdotes, and new information from an archive discovered during the flight, tell of fears, courage, humor, and the sheer adventure of the events that owned the veteransOCO youth. This is seat-of-the-pants flying at its most thrilling, recalling a time when ordinary young Americans were called upon to be heroes."
Hellcat vs Shiden/Shiden-Kai Tony Holmes 2019-01-24 By the early months of 1944 in the Pacific, the US Navy's burgeoning force of carrier-based F6F-3/5 Hellcats had pretty much wiped the skies clear of Japanese fighters during a series of one-sided aerial engagements. However, starting in October they faced the superb Kawanishi N1K1/2 Shiden/Shiden-Kai, a formidable fighter with improved armament, a powerful engine and excellent manoeuvrability that in contrast to earlier Japanese fighters had the ability to withstand a greater degree of battle damage. Japanese pilots using this aircraft would claim more than 170 aerial victories over Kyushu and whilst escorting Kamikazes attacking Allied ships off Okinawa. US Navy Hellcat pilots in turn were credited with many of the scores of Shiden-Kais that were downed attempting to defend Japan. This fully illustrated book compares these two fascinating aircraft, using specially commissioned artwork, first-hand accounts and a thorough technical analysis.
Suicide Squads of World War II Richard O'Neill 1988
Whirlwind Barrett Tillman 2010-03-02 WHIRLWIND is the first book to tell the complete, awe-inspiring story of the Allied air war against Japan—the most important strategic bombing campaign inhistory. From the audacious Doolittle raid in 1942 to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945, award-winning historian Barrett Tillman recounts the saga from the perspectives of American and British aircrews who flew unprecedented missions overthousands of miles of ocean, as well as of the generalsand admirals who commanded them. Whether describing the experiences of bomber crews based in China or the Marianas, fighter pilotson Iwo Jima, or carrier aviators at sea, Tillman provides vivid details of the lives of the fliers and their support personnel. Whirlwind takes readers into the cockpits and gun turrets of the mighty B-29 Superfortress, the largest bomber built up to that time. Tillman dramatically re-creates the sweep of wartime emotions that crews endured on fifteen-hour missions, grappling with the extreme tedium of cramped spaces and with adrenaline spikes in flak-studded skies, knowing that a bailout would put them at the mercy of a merciless enemy or an unforgiving sea. A major character is the controversial and brilliant General Curtis LeMay, who rewrote strategic bombing tactics. His command’s fire-bombing missions incinerated fully half of Tokyo and many other cities, crippling Japan’s industry while still failing to force surrender. Whirlwind examines the immense logistics and construction efforts necessary to support Superfortresses in Asia and the Mariana Islands, as well as the tireless efforts of engineers to build huge air bases from scratch.It also describes the unheralded missions that American bomber crews flew from the Aleutian Islands to Japan’s northernmost Kuril Islands. Never has the Japanese side of the story been so thoroughly examined. If Washington, D.C., represented a “second front” in Army-Navy rivalry, the situation in Tokyo approached a full-contact sport. Tillman’s description of Japan’s willfully inadequate approach to civil defense is eye-opening. Similarly, he examines the mind-set in Tokyo’s war cabinet, which ignored the atomic destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, requiring the emperor’s personal intervention to avert a ghastly Allied invasion. Tillman shows how, despite the Allies’ ultimate success, mistakes and shortsighted policies made victory more costly in lives and effort. He faults the lack of a unified command for allowing the Army Air Forces and the Navy to pursue parochial goals at the expense of the larger mission, and he questions the premature commitment of the enormously sophisticated B-29 to the most primitive theater in India and China. Whirlwind is one of the last histories of World War II written with the contribution of men who fought in it.With unexcelled macro- and microperspectives, Whirlwind is destined to become a standard reference on the war, on multiservice operations, and on the human capacity for individual heroism and national folly.
You Suck at Racing Ian Korf 2016-05-12 A lot of books on driving are written by professional racers who assume you too want to be a professional racer. Not this book. It's written by a hobbyist who suggests you keep your day job. Besides, it's much more fun being an enthusiastic amateur than a jaded professional (just ask someone in the sex industry). This book is designed to help the average driver make the transition from commuter to safe road racer in as few pages as possible. I wrote this book because it's what I would have wanted to read when I first became interested in track driving: succinct, nerdy, practical, and occasionally diverting. It is not intended as a definitive tome or a work of art. It's more like a sandwich: convenient and nourishing.
A Handbook of Fighter Aircraft Francis Crosby 2004 A Handbook of Fighter Aircraft An illustrated A-Z catalog of over 170 aircraft, including early planes used in World War I, fighters from the inter-war years and World War II, and the highly powerful supersonic jet aircraft of today A guide to the different type of weapons used in air combat: machine-guns, cannons, rockets, and missiles Specification boxes for each aircraft provide at-a-glance information about the planes' country of origin, first flight, power, armament, size, weights, and performance Features color and black and white photographs from the Imperial War Museum Photograph Archive, many never previously published Includes facts and anecdotes about battles and fighter aces, and a glossary explaining aviation terms and abbreviations.
Luftwaffe Secret Projects Walter Schick 1997 Designs from Germany's aerodynamics engineers detail proposed military aircraft, including wing span and area, aspect ratio, length, height, weight, speed, and armament
P-51B/C Mustang Chris Bucholtz 2022-02-17 This new volume straps the reader into the cockpit of the P-51B/C as the Mustang-equipped fighter groups of the 'Mighty Eighth' Air Force attempt to defend massed heavy bomber formations from deadly Luftwaffe fighters charged with defending the Third Reich. Luftwaffe Reichsmarschall Hermann Göring admitted that the appearance of long-range Mustangs over Berlin spelled the end of the Jagdwaffe's ability to defeat American daylight bombing. But the Mustang was far more than an escort – it was a deadly hunter that could out-perform nearly every German fighter when it was introduced into combat. Entering combat in Europe in December 1943, P-51Bs and P-51Cs had advantages over German Bf 109s and Fw 190s in respect to the altitude they could reach, their rate of climb and top speed. Initially tapped for close bomber escort, Mustangs were quickly turned loose to range ahead of the bomber stream in order to challenge German fighters before they could assemble to engage the bombers en masse. Thanks to the Mustang's superior performance, USAAF pilots effectively blunted the Luftwaffe's tried and tested tactic for destroying B-17s and B-24s. Boldness and aggression in aerial combat meant that P-51B/C pilots inflicted a rapidly mounting toll on their German counterparts in the West during the early months of 1944, contributing mightily to Allied air superiority over northern France on D-Day. This volume, packed full of first-hand accounts, expertly recreates the combat conditions and flying realities for Mustang pilots (including headline aces such as Don Blakeslee and Don Gentile, as well as lesser known aviators). It is heavily illustrated with photographs, artwork and innovative and colourful 3D ribbon diagrams, which will provide a realistic overview of the most dynamic dogfights in aviation history.
Fighter Combat Robert L. Shaw 1985 This book provides a detailed discussion of one-on-one dog-fights and multi-fighter team work tactics. Full discussions of fighter aircraft and weapons systems performance are provided along with an explanation of radar intercept tactics and an analysis of the elements involved in the performance of fighter missions.
Japanese Aircraft of the Pacific War René J. Francillon 1987-02 The most significant types of aircraft operated by the Army and the Navy immediately before and during the Pacific War are described in the two main sections of this book, while a series of appendices provides information on less important Japanese military aircraft, foreign-designed aircraft operated by Japanese forces, aircraft carriers and tenders, aero-engines and aircraft armament.
Imperial Japanese Navy Aces 1937–45 Henry Sakaida 2012-10-20 The outcome of the Pacific War was heavily influenced by the results of naval battles between the Imperial Japanese fleet and the US Navy. One of the key elements was Japan's large fighter component, which had gained experience over Manchuria, China and Mongolia in the late 1930s. Flying A5Ms, at least 21 pilots achieved 'acedom' securing air superiority for the invaders. Manufacturer Mitsubishi derived much from these campaigns, producing one of the best fighters of the War, the A6M Zero-Sen. Navy pilots proved to be highly skilled when engaged by the Allied forces, Pacific. Pilots like Nishizawa, Sagita and Sakai scoring more than 60 kills apiece.
Warplanes of World War II Up Close Robert Jackson 2015-12-15 Although airplanes were used to some degree in conflicts prior to 1939, World War II was when military aviation truly became a vital component of war plans. Many sophisticated warplanes were developed, increasing the power and accuracy of aerial bombing and tactical air support. This resource provides an in-depth look from every angle at aircraft such as the P-51 Mustang and Boeing B-29 Superfortress, demonstrating how these planes contributed to how each nation waged war during World War II.
The B-29 Superfortress Chronology, 1934Ð1960 Robert A. Mann 2010-01-19 The Boeing B-29 Superfortress lived an operational life of only 26 years, but what a life it was. The introduction to this book provides basic information on the physical plane: dimensions, specs, leading particulars and operational usages. Then an exhaustive day-by-day chronology of the B-29 is presented—from the earliest designs in 1934 through thousands of missions and aircraft events in World War II and Korea to the 1960 retirement of the last operational B-29. The book also includes an extensive glossary and three appendices, which provide a discussion of the general anatomy of a mission, a sample of operational voice or radio codes used in 1945, and a guide to (very unofficial) aircraft names.
Warplanes & Air Battles of World War II Bernard Fitzsimons 1973
Genda's Blade Henry Sakaida 2003-01 Captain Minoru Genda was the mastermind behind the raid on Pearl Harbor. He was commander of the 343 Kokutai-an elite unit of handpicked pilots chosen to fly Japan's newest and most advanced fighter, the Shiden-Kai (George), in the bitter defensive air battles over the Japanese homeland during the first half of 1945. The authors have spent years tracing and interviewing former pilots of both the 343 Kokutai and the American carrier and bomber groups that they encountered, to piece together this dramatic story and tell it largely from the personal perspective. The narrative is spiced with 300 remarkable photographs, most of which are published for the first time in an English language book. Accompanied by color artwork and written by acknowledged experts on Japanese military aviation, this book will be an essential requirement for any student of the Pacific air war.
The Imperial Japanese Navy in the Pacific War Mark Stille 2014-11-20 The Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) was the third most powerful navy in the world at the start of World War II, and came to dominate the Pacific in the early months of the war. This was a remarkable turnaround for a navy that only began to modernize in 1868, although defeats inflicted on the Russians and Chinese in successive wars at the turn of the century gave a sense of the threat the IJN was to pose. Bringing together for the first time material previously published in Osprey series books, and with the addition of new writing making use of the most recent research, this book details the Japanese ships which fought in the Pacific and examines the principles on which they were designed, how they were armed, when and where they were deployed and how effective they were in battle. A valuable reference source for Pacific War enthusiasts and historians, The Imperial Japanese Navy in the Pacific War provides a history of the IJN's deployment and engagements, analysis of the evolution of strategy and tactics, and finally addresses the question of whether it truly was a modern navy, fully prepared for the rigors of combat in the Pacific.
B-29 Hunters of the JAAF Koji Takaki 2012-10-20 B-29!' No other term struck such terror in the hearts of the Japanese public during World War 2 than this single, most-hated name. It was then only natural that the pilots who attempted to shoot these high-flying Boeing bombers out of the skies over Tokyo, Nagasaki, Hiroshima and Kobe should become known as the elite of the Japanese Army Air Force. This book details the exploits of the 'Dragon Slayers' who, flying the very latest singleand twin-engined fighters, exacted a heavy toll on the AAF Boeing bombers using a range of tactics including ramming.
The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Combat Aircraft of World War II Bill Gunston 1978 Contains more than seven hundred illustrations of military aircraft of World War II used by both Allied and Axis Countries, together with capsule specifications and history
Japanese Experimental Transport Aircraft of the Pacific War Giuseppe Picarella 2011-08 Information in English on Japanese WW2 transport aircraft is hard to find, and in this book the story of the Japanese experimental transport designs is told in great detail. The context is explained, with information on the low priority given to transport aircraft and the disastrous implications of that neglect for the Japanese war effort. Fully illustrated with many rare photos and excellent artwork, the various designs and proposals for transport aircraft during the war are described and discussed, both novel designs and adaptations of bomber aircraft. Giuseppe (Joe) Picarella is a professional graphic artist specializing in aviation, whose work is seen in many major aviation journals. He is also an authority on Japanese WW2 aircraft, with a significant archive of rare photos and documents.
Canadian Warbirds of the Second World War Harold A. Skaarup 2001 This aviation handbook is intended to provide the reader with a quick reference to identify the military aircraft flown by the Royal Canadian Air Force, the Royal Canadian Navy and the Canadian Army during the Second World War. The handbooks in this series include a general description and a photograph from the Canadian Forces Archives of at least one of the key variants or marks of each aircraft that has been in Canadian service or used by Canadian servicemen overseas. Each aircraft is listed alphabetically by manufacturer, number and type. General details describing the aircraft’s engines, service ceiling, speed, armament or weapons load are included, along with a brief description of the Canadian or allied squadron in which Canadian aircrews used the aircraft operationally. This is the third volume in the series. It describes fighters, bombers and patrol aircraft flown by Canadians during the war. A list of museums, private aircraft collections and other locations where survivors preserved and displayed is also included. The handbook is not a definitive list of all Canadian-manufactured or operated aircraft, but it should serve as a quick reminder of the major examples flown on duty for anyone with an interest in Canadian military aviation.
B-17, Fortress at War Roger A. Freeman 1977
Ki-27 ‘Nate’ Aces Nicholas Millman 2013-08-20 Introduced into service early in 1938 during a time of extensive re-organisation of Army air units, the Ki-27, known as the 97 Sen by its pilots, achieved its first successes during the so-called 'China Incident' against the mainly biplane types operated by the Chinese. On 10 April 1938 Ki-27 pilots of the 2nd Daitai (later to become the 64th Sentai) claimed 24 Chinese biplane fighters shot down for the loss of only two of their own. Almost within a year of its combat debut against the Chinese the 97 Sen was to be tested in fighting against the Russians during the Nomonhan Incident of 1939. Initially the 97 Sen proved superior to the Soviet I-16 monoplanes, but the latter were hastily modified to better engage the Japanese fighter and the Russian pilots rapidly adapted to exploit their own strengths and the enemy weaknesses. A handful of Japanese Army Air Force (JAAF) aces emerged from this showdown to be lauded by the Japanese press and ever associated with the iconic 97 Sen - Shimada the 'Red-Legged Hawk', Shihonara the 'Richthofen of the Orient' and Yoshiyama, the 'warrior of the Holombile Plateau'. These were the glory days for the JAAF and many of the successful 97 Sen pilots went on to become the outstanding leaders and veteran aces of the Pacific War. By December, 1941 the JAAF had just started to replace the 97 Sen with the more modern Hayabusa, but the fixed undercarriage fighter still equipped 17 of the 19 Army fighter Sentai and took the brunt of the offensive against the British and Americans in Southeast Asia and the Philippines, as well as the Homeland Defence capability at the time of the Doolittle Raid. Initially facing more modern Allied types of fighter, the 97 Sen was more than able to hold its own by exploiting its outstanding aerobatic qualities. But the writing was on the wall for an unarmoured, fixed undercarriage aircraft with two rifle-calibre machine guns as the Allies consolidated and began their fightback. In China, Chennault had already assessed the 97 Sen's strengths and weaknesses, describing it as a fighter that 'climbs like a sky rocket and manoeuvres like a squirrel'. Prior to the outbreak of the Pacific War he had sent a complete dossier on the type to the USA where it was studiously ignored. The pace of re-equipment with new types and the resurgence of Allied airpower required JAAF units to continue with the 97 Sen as main equipment, especially on the quieter fronts and in Home Defence. By 1943 it was considered seriously obsolete but was still being encountered in combat by Allied pilots, especially in the air defence role. The Ki-27 also found an important secondary role as an armed fighter trainer, equipping an important number of training units and flying schools. The Mansyu Ki-79, a purpose built trainer produced in both single and two-seater versions, was based on the Ki-27. It also served expediently in the suicide attack role and in at least one epic air defence combat. In February 1945, over Chiba, experienced ace WO Masatoshi Masuzawa, flying one of the open cockpit trainers, downed a US Navt Hellcat. Masuzawa had scored his first victory in a 97 Sen over Nomonhan in 1939, and in three months of fighting there had claimed 12 enemy aircraft shot down. He epitomised the veteran JAAF flyers who had first taken the 97 Sen to war and survived to see the atom bombs dropped on their homeland.
The First Team John Lundstrom 2013-04-11 Hailed as one of the finest examples of aviation research, this comprehensive 1984 study presents a detailed and scrupulously accurate operational history of carrier-based air warfare. From the earliest operations in the Pacific through the decisive Battle of Midway, it offers a narrative account of how ace fighter pilots like Jimmy Thach and Butch O'Hare and their skilled VF squadron mates - called the "first team" - amassed a remarkable combat record in the face of desperate odds. Tapping both American and Japanese sources, historian John B. Lundstrom reconstructs every significant action and places these extraordinary fighters within the context of overall carrier operations. He writes from the viewpoint of the pilots themselves, after interviewing some fifty airmen from each side, to give readers intimate details of some of the most exciting aerial engagements of the war. At the same time he assesses the role the fighter squadrons played in key actions and shows how innovations in fighter tactics and gunnery techniques were a primary reason for the reversal of American fortunes. After more than twenty years in print, the book remains the definitive account and is being published in paperback for the first time to reach an even larger audience.
F4U Corsair vs Ki-84 "Frank" Edward M. Young 2016-05-24 The Vought Corsair was the first American single-engine fighter to exceed four hundred mph, establishing dominance over the Mitsubishi Type Zero-sen with a kill ratio greater than ten to one. The Ki-84 Hayate was introduced by the Japanese specifically to counter this growing American dominance of the skies over the Pacific. Built in greater numbers than any other late-war Japanese fighter, nearly three thousand were completed between 1944 and 1945. This volume examines the clashes between the Corsair and Ki-84 in the closing stages of the war, revealing how Corsair pilots had to adapt their techniques and combat strategies to account for these newer types, which proved harder to shoot down. It also reveals how the eventual six-to-one kill rate was largely driven by the reduced quality of Japanese fighter pilots due to the high casualty rates inflicted on the Japanese Air Force during the air battles over the Solomon Islands.
Danger's Hour Maxwell Taylor Kennedy 2009-11-03 Drawing on years of research and firsthand interviews with both American and Japanese survivors, Maxwell Taylor Kennedy draws a gripping portrait of men bravely serving their countries in war and the advent of a terrifying new weapon, suicide bombing, that nearly halted the most powerful nation in the world. In the closing months of World War II, Americans found themselves facing a new weapon: kamikazes--the first men to use airplanes as suicide weapons. By the beginning of 1945, facing imminent invasion, Japan turned to its most idealistic young men and demanded of them the greatest sacrifice. On May 11, 1945, days after Germany's surrender, the USS Bunker Hill--with thousands of crewmen and the most sophisticated naval technology available--was 70 miles off the coast of Okinawa when pilot Kiyoshi Ogawa flew his plane into the ship, killing 393 Americans in the worst suicide attack against America until September 11.--From publisher description.
Suicide Squads Richard O'Neill 2015-06-25 In a detailed exploration of the hazardous 'Special Attack' weapons and forces of World War II, Suicide Squads examines the role of explosive motorboats, midget submarines, human torpedoes and kamikaze aircraft. In addition to weapon development, Richard O'Neil describes the actions themselves including Pearl Harbour, the raid on Sydney Harbour and special forces mission at Guadalcanal, Midway and Okinawa. The bravery of the men from all sides who went to war in suicidal or near-suicidal weapons cannot be overestimated. The story of these special attack forces remains a testimony to ingenuity, desperation and courage.
World War II Norman Polmar 1996 Includes over 2,400 entries covering the people, places, politics, battles, and weapons of the Second World War
Japanese Aircraft, 1910-1941 Robert C. Mikesh 1990 This popular and highly-acclaimed series includes an abundance of photos, accurate line drawings, fascinating evaluations of aircraft design, and complete histories of aircraft manufacturers.
Clash of Wings Walter J. Boyne 2012-03-13 Boyne resurrects the war of the skies in all its heroic and tragic drama, while supplying insightful, expert conclusions about previously overlooked aspects of the war, including the essential role of American bombers in Europe; Germany's miscalculation of the number of planes required for victory; the Allies' slow start in deploying maximum air power—and why they eventually triumphed.
The Illustrated Directory of Fighters Mike Spick 2002 This fact-packed A to Z reference features extensive data (including dimensions, performance, armaments, and variants) on more than 200 of the world's fighter aircraft from World War I to the present day, not to mention hundreds of photos, most of them in color, illustrating the aircraft in action. In addition, each fighter is accompanied by expert commentaries detailing its development, service, and combat histories.
F6F Hellcat vs A6M Zero-sen Edward M. Young 2014-08-20 The Grumman F6F Hellcat and Mitsubishi A6M Zero-sen were the two principal opposing fighters in the brutal aerial clashes of the Pacific War from 1943 onwards. Reminiscent of the preceding F4F Wildcat, the F6F Hellcat was designed specifically to counter the earlier A6M2 Zero-sen, the strengths and weaknesses of which became fully understood by US designers after an undamaged example was recovered in the Aleutians. The powerful Hellcat had an impressive top speed, rate of climb and armament, and it retained its predecessor's incredible ruggedness. The A6M5 Zero-sen was also born out of an earlier type, but was intended merely as a stop-gap until more modern Japanese fighters could be produced to restore performance parity with Allied aircraft. The chaotic conditions of the Japanese Aircraft industry and war economy prevented new types from being built.Featuring detailed artwork illustrating the technical specifications of these two types and the dramatic encounters between them, this volume focuses on how these iconic fighters came into being, and how they fared as they faced one another over the Pacific skies of World War II.
Fighter Aircraft Francis Crosby 2011-12-01
J2M Raiden and N1K1/2 Shiden/Shiden-Kai Aces Yasuho Izawa 2016-04-21 Although seen as a replacement for the A6M Zero-sen carrier-based fighter, the Mitsubishi J2M Raiden was actually designed as a land-based naval interceptor optimised for speed rather than manoeuvrability. Engine cooling problems for its Mitsubishi Kasai 23 engine, airflow and flight control issues plagued the Raiden's development, but despite these production delays, aces Sadaaki Akamatsu Yoshihiro Aoki, Susumu Ito and Susumu Ishihara all claimed significant scores in the Raiden. Kawanishi's N1K family of fighters were privately developed by the manufacturer from the N1K Kyofu floatplane fighter. Again plagued by structural and engine maladies, the N1K1-J Shiden eventually entered frontline service in time to see considerable action in the doomed defence of the Philippines in October 1944. Despite suffering heavy losses, the units equipped with new fighter proved that the N1K could more than hold its own against P-38s and F6Fs. The improved N1K2-J Shiden-KAI started to reach the frontline by late 1944 – in time for defence of the Home Islands. Here, it proved to be the best IJN fighter of the war.

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