Key System Streetcars Vernon J. Sappers 2007
The Death and Life of Great American Cities Jane Jacobs 2016-07-20 Thirty years after its publication, The Death and Life of Great American Cities was described by The New York Times as "perhaps the most influential single work in the history of town planning....[It] can also be seen in a much larger context. It is first of all a work of literature; the descriptions of street life as a kind of ballet and the bitingly satiric account of traditional planning theory can still be read for pleasure even by those who long ago absorbed and appropriated the book's arguments." Jane Jacobs, an editor and writer on architecture in New York City in the early sixties, argued that urban diversity and vitality were being destroyed by powerful architects and city planners. Rigorous, sane, and delightfully epigrammatic, Jacobs's small masterpiece is a blueprint for the humanistic management of cities. It is sensible, knowledgeable, readable, indispensable. The author has written a new foreword for this Modern Library edition.
The Great Influenza John M. Barry 2005-10-04 #1 New York Times bestseller “Barry will teach you almost everything you need to know about one of the deadliest outbreaks in human history.”—Bill Gates "Monumental... an authoritative and disturbing morality tale."—Chicago Tribune The strongest weapon against pandemic is the truth. Read why in the definitive account of the 1918 Flu Epidemic. Magisterial in its breadth of perspective and depth of research, The Great Influenza provides us with a precise and sobering model as we confront the epidemics looming on our own horizon. As Barry concludes, "The final lesson of 1918, a simple one yet one most difficult to execute, is that...those in authority must retain the public's trust. The way to do that is to distort nothing, to put the best face on nothing, to try to manipulate no one. Lincoln said that first, and best. A leader must make whatever horror exists concrete. Only then will people be able to break it apart." At the height of World War I, history’s most lethal influenza virus erupted in an army camp in Kansas, moved east with American troops, then exploded, killing as many as 100 million people worldwide. It killed more people in twenty-four months than AIDS killed in twenty-four years, more in a year than the Black Death killed in a century. But this was not the Middle Ages, and 1918 marked the first collision of science and epidemic disease.
Would You Kill the Fat Man? David Edmonds 2013-10-06 A runaway train is racing toward five men who are tied to the track. Unless the train is stopped, it will inevitably kill all five men. You are standing on a footbridge looking down on the unfolding disaster. However, a fat man, a stranger, is standing next to you: if you push him off the bridge, he will topple onto the line and, although he will die, his chunky body will stop the train, saving five lives. Would you kill the fat man? The question may seem bizarre. But it's one variation of a puzzle that has baffled moral philosophers for almost half a century and that more recently has come to preoccupy neuroscientists, psychologists, and other thinkers as well. In this book, David Edmonds, coauthor of the best-selling Wittgenstein's Poker, tells the riveting story of why and how philosophers have struggled with this ethical dilemma, sometimes called the trolley problem. In the process, he provides an entertaining and informative tour through the history of moral philosophy. Most people feel it's wrong to kill the fat man. But why? After all, in taking one life you could save five. As Edmonds shows, answering the question is far more complex--and important--than it first appears. In fact, how we answer it tells us a great deal about right and wrong.
Singin' and Swingin' and Gettin' Merry Like Christmas Maya Angelou 2009-04-21 In this third self-contained volume of her autobiography, which began with I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, Maya Angelou moves into the adult world. Maya struggles to support herself and her son through a series of odd jobs and weathers a failed marriage to a white man before landing a gig singing in one of the most popular nightclubs on the San Francisco coast. From there, she is called to New York to join the cast of Porgy and Bess. Maya soon finds herself on a joyous and dramatic adventure, touring abroad through Italy, France, Greece, Yugoslavia, and Egypt with spirited cast members, and performing for large, enthusiastic audiences. The exciting experience is dampened only by Maya’s nagging guilt that she has abandoned the person she loves most in life, her son, whose reentrance into her world reveals to Maya the healing power of devotion and love. Charged with Maya Angelou’s remarkable sense of life and love, Singin’ and Swingin’ and Gettin’ Merry Like Christmas is a unique celebration of the human condition–and an enthralling saga that has touched, inspired, and empowered readers worldwide.
San Francisco's West of Twin Peaks Jacqueline Proctor 2006 Originally part of Rancho San Miguel, the West of Twin Peaks district was among the last to be developed in San Francisco. Behrend Joost, using the fortune he made to start dredging the Panama Canal, built a railway in 1891 to bring people out to his "cr¨me de la cr¨me" subdivision next to the forest planted by Comstock Lode millionaire Adolph Sutro. After the streetcar tunnel was bored through Twin Peaks in 1918, A. S. Baldwin planned neighborhoods on Sutro's estate around Mount Davidson. With noted architects and engineers, Baldwin created "residential parks" with well-built Craftsman, art deco, English, and Spanish homes on curvilinear landscaped boulevards. These "suburbs in the city"--among them, Sunnyside, Balboa Terrace, Ingleside Terraces, Westwood Park, Westwood Highlands, Monterey Heights, Mount Davidson Manor, Sherwood Forest, and Miraloma Park--became home to thousands and a unique part of the San Francisco tapestry.
New Orleans Cookbook Rima Collin 1987 Accurate, step-by-step recipes for a multitude of authentic dishes and concoctions, from countryside and city, traditional and contemporary, well-known and exotic, from the main cuisines of New Orleans
Distributed Acoustic Sensing in Geophysics Yingping Li 2022-02-02 Distributed Acoustic Sensing in Geophysics Methods and Applications Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) is a technology that records sound and vibration signals along a fiber optic cable. Its advantages of high resolution, continuous, and real-time measurements mean that DAS systems have been rapidly adopted for a range of applications, including hazard mitigation, energy industries, geohydrology, environmental monitoring, and civil engineering. Distributed Acoustic Sensing in Geophysics: Methods and Applications presents experiences from both industry and academia on using DAS in a range of geophysical applications. Volume highlights include: DAS concepts, principles, and measurements Comprehensive review of the historical development of DAS and related technologies DAS applications in hydrocarbon, geothermal, and mining industries DAS applications in seismology DAS applications in environmental and shallow geophysics The American Geophysical Union promotes discovery in Earth and space science for the benefit of humanity. Its publications disseminate scientific knowledge and provide resources for researchers, students, and professionals.
California Style Manual Robert E. Formichi 1977
San Francisco's Magnificent Streetcars Kenneth C. Springirth 2015 San Francisco's first cable car line opened in 1873. The successful development of the electric streetcar by Frank Sprague in 1888 plus the 1906 San Francisco earthquake resulted in the decline of the cable car system. Concerned that the cable car system would vanish, San Francisco resident Friedel Klussmann rallied public support to save the cars. The 1982 shutdown of the cable car lines for their rebuilding led to Trolley Festivals beginning in 1983 until 1987 using a variety of historic streetcars on Market Street. Those successful festivals resulted in rebuilding the streetcar track on Market Street and the establishment of the F streetcar line in 1995 using Presidents' Conference Committee streetcars purchased from Philadelphia and refurbished in a variety of paint schemes that represented cities that once had streetcar service. In addition, the line features vintage Peter Witt streetcars from Milan, Italy; a boat like streetcar from England; and other unique cars. During 2000, the F line was extended to Fisherman's wharf and has become one of the most successful streetcar lines in the United States. This book is a photographic essay of "San Francisco's Magnificent Streetcars" along with its historic cable cars and hill climbing trolley coaches.
Project Management Harold Kerzner 2013-01-22 A new edition of the most popular book of project management case studies, expanded to include more than 100 cases plus a "super case" on the Iridium Project Case studies are an important part of project management education and training. This Fourth Edition of Harold Kerzner's Project Management Case Studies features a number of new cases covering value measurement in project management. Also included is the well-received "super case," which covers all aspects of project management and may be used as a capstone for a course. This new edition: Contains 100-plus case studies drawn from real companies to illustrate both successful and poor implementation of project management Represents a wide range of industries, including medical and pharmaceutical, aerospace, manufacturing, automotive, finance and banking, and telecommunications Covers cutting-edge areas of construction and international project management plus a "super case" on the Iridium Project, covering all aspects of project management Follows and supports preparation for the Project Management Professional (PMP®) Certification Exam Project Management Case Studies, Fourth Edition is a valuable resource for students, as well as practicing engineers and managers, and can be used on its own or with the new Eleventh Edition of Harold Kerzner's landmark reference, Project Management: A Systems Approach to Planning, Scheduling, and Controlling. (PMP and Project Management Professional are registered marks of the Project Management Institute, Inc.)
Historic Photos of San Francisco Rebecca Schall 2006 From the 1906 earthquake to famous sights like the cable cars, Alcatraz, and the Golden Gate Bridge, Historic Photos of San Francisco is a photographic history collected from the area's top archives. With around 200 photographs, many of which have never been published, this beautiful coffee table book highlights the historical growth from the mid 1800s to the late 1900s of ""the City by the Bay"" in stunning black and white photography. The book captures scenes of the people, places, and events important to the history of this unique city, accompanied by insightful captions and historical analysis. Spanning two centuries and two hundred photographs, this book is a must-have for any long-time resident or history lover of San Francisco!
Baltimore Streetcar Memories Kenneth C. Springirth 2017-12-11 Baltimore was the first United States city to begin regularly scheduled electric railway service in 1885. However, because of technical problems the line had to go back to horse car operation. After Frank J. Sprague developed an electric streetcar powered by an overhead wire for Richmond, Virginia; Baltimore adopted the new system and in 1893 opened the first electric line in the United States to operate on an elevated structure. By 1899, Baltimore streetcar lines, with their unique 5 foot 4.5 inch track gauge, were unified by the United Railways and Electric Company which purchased 885 semi-convertible cars with windows that could be raised up for summer operation and lowered for winter operation. Baltimore Transit Company was the third United States system to introduce modern Presidents' Conference Committee (PCC) cars and at its peak operated the eighth largest fleet of these cars. A combination of factors including a ridership decline and making many downtown streets one way contributed to conversion to an all bus system. Baltimore Streetcar Memories is a photographic essay of history of the Baltimore, Maryland streetcar system up to its closure in 1963 and the return of a modern streetcar/light rail system 29 years later in 1992.
An Introduction to Neural Networks Kevin Gurney 2018-10-08 Though mathematical ideas underpin the study of neural networks, the author presents the fundamentals without the full mathematical apparatus. All aspects of the field are tackled, including artificial neurons as models of their real counterparts; the geometry of network action in pattern space; gradient descent methods, including back-propagation; associative memory and Hopfield nets; and self-organization and feature maps. The traditionally difficult topic of adaptive resonance theory is clarified within a hierarchical description of its operation. The book also includes several real-world examples to provide a concrete focus. This should enhance its appeal to those involved in the design, construction and management of networks in commercial environments and who wish to improve their understanding of network simulator packages. As a comprehensive and highly accessible introduction to one of the most important topics in cognitive and computer science, this volume should interest a wide range of readers, both students and professionals, in cognitive science, psychology, computer science and electrical engineering.
Urban Transit Systems and Technology Vukan R. Vuchic 2007-02-16 This is the only current and in print book covering the full field of transit systems and technology. Beginning with a history of transit and its role in urban development, the book proceeds to define relevant terms and concepts, and then present detailed coverage of all urban transit modes and the most efficient system designs for each. Including coverage of such integral subjects as travel time, vehicle propulsion, system integration, fully supported with equations and analytical methods, this book is the primary resource for students of transit as well as those professionals who design and operate these key pieces of urban infrastructure.
Army at Home Judith Giesberg 2009-09-01 Introducing readers to women whose Civil War experiences have long been ignored, Judith Giesberg examines the lives of working-class women in the North, for whom the home front was a battlefield of its own. Black and white working-class women managed farms that had been left without a male head of household, worked in munitions factories, made uniforms, and located and cared for injured or dead soldiers. As they became more active in their new roles, they became visible as political actors, writing letters, signing petitions, moving (or refusing to move) from their homes, and confronting civilian and military officials. At the heart of the book are stories of women who fought the draft in New York and Pennsylvania, protested segregated streetcars in San Francisco and Philadelphia, and demanded a living wage in the needle trades and safer conditions at the Federal arsenals where they labored. Giesberg challenges readers to think about women and children who were caught up in the military conflict but nonetheless refused to become its collateral damage. She offers a dramatic reinterpretation of how America's Civil War reshaped the lived experience of race and gender and brought swift and lasting changes to working-class family life.
Backpacker 2004-06 Backpacker brings the outdoors straight to the reader's doorstep, inspiring and enabling them to go more places and enjoy nature more often. The authority on active adventure, Backpacker is the world's first GPS-enabled magazine, and the only magazine whose editors personally test the hiking trails, camping gear, and survival tips they publish. Backpacker's Editors' Choice Awards, an industry honor recognizing design, feature and product innovation, has become the gold standard against which all other outdoor-industry awards are measured.
Geologic Trips Ted Konigsmark 1998
Wherever There's a Fight Elaine Elinson 2009 Describes the history of civil liberties in California in reference to all types of minorities, including immigrants, racial minorities, women, homosexuals, the disabled and the poor. Original.
Professional Baking Wayne Gisslen 2004-04-06 One of the most respected cookbooks in the industry - the 2002 IACP Cookbook Award Winner for Best Technical/Reference - "Professional Baking" brings aspiring pastry chefs and serious home bakers the combined talent of Wayne Gisslen and the prizewinning Le Corden Bleu in one volume. The revised Fourth Edition offers complete instruction in every facet of the baker's craft, offering more than 750 recipes - including 150 from Le Cordon Bleu - for everything from cakes, pies, pastries, and cookies to artisan breads. Page after page of clear instruction, the hallmark of all Gisslen culinary books, will help you master the basics - such as pate brisee and puff pastry -and confidently hone techniques for making spectacular desserts using spun sugar and other decorative work. More than 500 color photographs illustrate ingredients and procedures as well as dozens of stunning breads and finished desserts.
"Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!": Adventures of a Curious Character Richard P. Feynman 2018-02-06 One of the most famous science books of our time, the phenomenal national bestseller that "buzzes with energy, anecdote and life. It almost makes you want to become a physicist" (Science Digest). Richard P. Feynman, winner of the Nobel Prize in physics, thrived on outrageous adventures. In this lively work that “can shatter the stereotype of the stuffy scientist” (Detroit Free Press), Feynman recounts his experiences trading ideas on atomic physics with Einstein and cracking the uncrackable safes guarding the most deeply held nuclear secrets—and much more of an eyebrow-raising nature. In his stories, Feynman’s life shines through in all its eccentric glory—a combustible mixture of high intelligence, unlimited curiosity, and raging chutzpah. Included for this edition is a new introduction by Bill Gates.
New Orleans Fabulous Streetcars Kenneth C. Springirth 2014-06-19 The first street railway opened in New Orleans in 1835. Over the years various methods of powering the streetcars including horses, stream locomotives, overhead cable system, and fireless locomotives were tried. In 1893, electric streetcar operation began. At its peak in 1922, New Orleans had 225 miles of electric streetcar lines in operation. Ridership and streetcar lines declined with increased use of automobiles and the hard economic times of the Great Depression. While ridership surged during World War II, following the war the decline in transit riding continued the conversion of streetcar lines to bus operation. With the end of the Canal streetcar line in 1964, only the St. Charles streetcar line remained. In 1983, the New Orleans Regional Transit Authority acquired the public transit system. With increased public awareness of the important heritage of the St. Charles streetcar line, the first new streetcar line in 60 years in New Orleans opened on the Riverfront during 1988. Its success contributed to the restoration of streetcars on Canal Street in 2004. This book provides a photographic essay of the New Orleans streetcar system including the new Loyola streetcar line that opened in 2013 and is part of New Orleans Fabulous Streetcars. "
A Streetcar to Subduction and Other Plate Tectonic Trips by Public Transport in San Francisco Clyde Wahrhaftig 1984-01-01
Emily Post's Etiquette, 19th Edition Lizzie Post 2017-04-18 Completely revised and updated with a focus on civility and inclusion, the 19th edition of Emily Post’s Etiquette is the most trusted resource for navigating life’s every situation From social networking to social graces, Emily Post is the definitive source on etiquette for generations of Americans. That tradition continues with the fully revised and updated 19th edition of Etiquette. Authored by etiquette experts Lizzie Post and Daniel Post Senning—Emily Post’s great-great grandchildren—this edition tackles classic etiquette and manners advice with an eye toward diversity and the contemporary sensibility that etiquette is defined by consideration, respect, and honesty. As our personal and professional networks grow, our lives become more intertwined. This 19th edition offers insight and wisdom with a fresh approach that directly reflects today’s social landscape. Emily Post’s Etiquette incorporates an even broader spectrum of issues while still addressing the traditions that Americans appreciate, including: Weddings Invitations Loss, grieving, and condolences Entertaining at home and planning celebrations Table manners Greetings and introductions Social media and personal branding Political conversations Living with neighbors Digital networking and job seeking The workplace Sports, gaming, and recreation Emily Post’s Etiquette also includes advice on names and titles—including Mx.—dress codes, invitations and gift-giving, thank-you notes and common courtesies, tipping and dining out, dating, and life milestones. It is the ultimate guide for anyone concerned with civility, inclusion, and kindness. Though times change, the principles of good etiquette remain the same. Above all, manners are a sensitive awareness of the needs of others—sincerity and good intentions always matter more than knowing which fork to use. The Emily Post Institute, Inc., is one of America’s most unique family businesses. In addition to authoring books, the Institute provides business etiquette seminars and e-learning courses worldwide, hosts the weekly Q&A podcast Awesome Etiquette and trains those interested in teaching Emily Post Etiquette.
Blown to Bits Harold Abelson 2008 Every day, billions of photographs, news stories, songs, X-rays, TV shows, phone calls, and emails are being scattered around the world as sequences of zeroes and ones: bits. We can't escape this explosion of digital information and few of us want to-the benefits are too seductive. The technology has enabled unprecedented innovation, collaboration, entertainment, and democratic participation. But the same engineering marvels are shattering centuries-old assumptions about privacy, identity, free expression, and personal control as more and more details of our lives are captured as digital data. Can you control who sees all that personal information about you? Can email be truly confidential, when nothing seems to be private? Shouldn't the Internet be censored the way radio and TV are? is it really a federal crime to download music? When you use Google or Yahoo! to search for something, how do they decide which sites to show you? Do you still have free speech in the digital world? Do you have a voice in shaping government or corporate policies about any of this? Blown to Bits offers provocative answers to these questions and tells intriguing real-life stories. This book is a wake-up call To The human consequences of the digital explosion.
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings Maya Angelou 2010-07-21 Here is a book as joyous and painful, as mysterious and memorable, as childhood itself. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings captures the longing of lonely children, the brute insult of bigotry, and the wonder of words that can make the world right. Maya Angelou’s debut memoir is a modern American classic beloved worldwide. Sent by their mother to live with their devout, self-sufficient grandmother in a small Southern town, Maya and her brother, Bailey, endure the ache of abandonment and the prejudice of the local “powhitetrash.” At eight years old and back at her mother’s side in St. Louis, Maya is attacked by a man many times her age—and has to live with the consequences for a lifetime. Years later, in San Francisco, Maya learns that love for herself, the kindness of others, her own strong spirit, and the ideas of great authors (“I met and fell in love with William Shakespeare”) will allow her to be free instead of imprisoned. Poetic and powerful, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings will touch hearts and change minds for as long as people read. “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings liberates the reader into life simply because Maya Angelou confronts her own life with such a moving wonder, such a luminous dignity.”—James Baldwin From the Paperback edition.
Business Ethics Stephen M. Byars 2018-09-24
The White Front Cars of San Francisco Charles A. Smallwood 1970
They Both Die at the End Adam Silvera 2017-09-05 Adam Silvera reminds us that there’s no life without death and no love without loss in this devastating yet uplifting story about two people whose lives change over the course of one unforgettable day. #1 New York Times bestseller * 4 starred reviews * A School Library Journal Best Book of the Year * A Kirkus Best Book of the Year * A Booklist Editors' Choice * A Bustle Best YA Novel * A Paste Magazine Best YA Book * A Book Riot Best Queer Book * A Buzzfeed Best YA Book of the Year * A BookPage Best YA Book of the Year On September 5, a little after midnight, Death-Cast calls Mateo Torrez and Rufus Emeterio to give them some bad news: They’re going to die today. Mateo and Rufus are total strangers, but, for different reasons, they’re both looking to make a new friend on their End Day. The good news: There’s an app for that. It’s called the Last Friend, and through it, Rufus and Mateo are about to meet up for one last great adventure—to live a lifetime in a single day. In the tradition of Before I Fall and If I Stay, They Both Die at the End is a tour de force from acclaimed author Adam Silvera, whose debut, More Happy Than Not, the New York Times called “profound.” Plus don't miss The First to Die at the End: #1 New York Times bestselling author Adam Silvera returns to the universe of international phenomenon They Both Die at the End in this prequel. New star-crossed lovers are put to the test on the first day of Death-Cast’s fateful calls.
Oakland Hills Erika Mailman 2004 The native Huchiun people once traversed the lush greenery of the Oakland hills, glimpsing breathtaking vistas as they followed the creeks down to the bay. In 1829, their territory became part of the huge land grant awarded to Mexican soldier Luis Maria Peralta, who in turn lost control of the hills as settlers arrived to harvest the virgin redwood. Although at one time a rustic haven for poet Joaquin Miller, who set up camp where a park now bears his name, the hills proved irresistible to developers. After transit lines reached the hills, promoters held picnics at the end of the line to entice people to buy land. Meadows and windswept hills turned to orchards and, soon after, to lovely neighborhoods. With the scars of the disastrous 1991 firestorm fading, the Oakland hills retain a bucolic beauty, a majestic backdrop for the city of Oakland.
Autonomous Driving Markus Maurer 2016-05-21 This book takes a look at fully automated, autonomous vehicles and discusses many open questions: How can autonomous vehicles be integrated into the current transportation system with diverse users and human drivers? Where do automated vehicles fall under current legal frameworks? What risks are associated with automation and how will society respond to these risks? How will the marketplace react to automated vehicles and what changes may be necessary for companies? Experts from Germany and the United States define key societal, engineering, and mobility issues related to the automation of vehicles. They discuss the decisions programmers of automated vehicles must make to enable vehicles to perceive their environment, interact with other road users, and choose actions that may have ethical consequences. The authors further identify expectations and concerns that will form the basis for individual and societal acceptance of autonomous driving. While the safety benefits of such vehicles are tremendous, the authors demonstrate that these benefits will only be achieved if vehicles have an appropriate safety concept at the heart of their design. Realizing the potential of automated vehicles to reorganize traffic and transform mobility of people and goods requires similar care in the design of vehicles and networks. By covering all of these topics, the book aims to provide a current, comprehensive, and scientifically sound treatment of the emerging field of “autonomous driving".
Los Angeles Magazine 2003-11 Los Angeles magazine is a regional magazine of national stature. Our combination of award-winning feature writing, investigative reporting, service journalism, and design covers the people, lifestyle, culture, entertainment, fashion, art and architecture, and news that define Southern California. Started in the spring of 1961, Los Angeles magazine has been addressing the needs and interests of our region for 48 years. The magazine continues to be the definitive resource for an affluent population that is intensely interested in a lifestyle that is uniquely Southern Californian.
Mechanisms and Mechanical Devices Sourcebook, Fourth Edition Neil Sclater 2007-01-01 Over 2000 drawings make this sourcebook a gold mine of information for learning and innovating in mechanical design The fourth edition of this unique engineering reference book covers the past, present, and future of mechanisms and mechanical devices. Among the thousands of proven mechanisms illustrated and described are many suitable for recycling into new mechanical, electromechanical, or mechatronic products and systems. Overviews of robotics, rapid prototyping, MEMS, and nanotechnology will get you up-to-speed on these cutting-edge technologies. Easy-to-read tutorial chapters on the basics of mechanisms and motion control will introduce those subjects to you or refresh your knowledge of them. Comprehensive index to speed your search for topics of interest Glossaries of terms for gears, cams, mechanisms, and robotics New industrial robot specifications and applications Mobile robots for exploration, scientific research, and defense INSIDE Mechanisms and Mechanical Devices Sourcebook, 4th Edition Basics of Mechanisms • Motion Control Systems • Industrial Robots • Mobile Robots • Drives and Mechanisms That Include Linkages, Gears, Cams, Genevas, and Ratchets • Clutches and Brakes • Devices That Latch, Fasten, and Clamp • Chains, Belts, Springs, and Screws • Shaft Couplings and Connections • Machines That Perform Specific Motions or Package, Convey, Handle, or Assure Safety • Systems for Torque, Speed, Tension, and Limit Control • Pneumatic, Hydraulic, Electric, and Electronic Instruments and Controls • Computer-Aided Design Concepts • Rapid Prototyping • New Directions in Mechanical Engineering
Walkable City Jeff Speck 2012-11-13 Jeff Speck has dedicated his career to determining what makes cities thrive. And he has boiled it down to one key factor: walkability. The very idea of a modern metropolis evokes visions of bustling sidewalks, vital mass transit, and a vibrant, pedestrian-friendly urban core. But in the typical American city, the car is still king, and downtown is a place that's easy to drive to but often not worth arriving at. Making walkability happen is relatively easy and cheap; seeing exactly what needs to be done is the trick. In this essential new book, Speck reveals the invisible workings of the city, how simple decisions have cascading effects, and how we can all make the right choices for our communities. Bursting with sharp observations and real-world examples, giving key insight into what urban planners actually do and how places can and do change, Walkable City lays out a practical, necessary, and eminently achievable vision of how to make our normal American cities great again.
Track Design Handbook for Light Rail Transit 2012 TCRP report 155 provides guidelines and descriptions for the design of various common types of light rail transit (LRT) track. The track structure types include ballasted track, direct fixation ("ballastless") track, and embedded track. The report considers the characteristics and interfaces of vehicle wheels and rail, tracks and wheel gauges, rail sections, alignments, speeds, and track moduli. The report includes chapters on vehicles, alignment, track structures, track components, special track work, aerial structures/bridges, corrosion control, noise and vibration, signals, traction power, and the integration of LRT track into urban streets.
San Francisco Noir Fred Lyon 2017-10-10 Following in the footsteps of classic films like The Maltese Falcon and The Lady from Shanghai, veteran photographer Fred Lyon creates images of San Francisco in high contrast with a sense of mystery. In this latest offering from the photographer of San Francisco: Portrait of a City 1940–1960, Lyon presents a darker tone, exploring the hidden corners of his native city. Images taken in the foggy night are illuminated only by neon signs, classic car headlights, apartment windows, or streetlights. Sharply dressed couples stroll out for evening shows, drivers travel down steep hills, and sailors work through the night at the old Fisherman's Wharf. Stylistically, many of the photographs are experimental the noir tone is enhanced by double exposures, elements of collage, and blurred motion. These strikingly evocative duotone images expose a view of San Francisco as only Fred Lyon could capture.
Sustainable Transportation Planning Jeffrey Tumlin 2012-01-24 "The Great American Dream of cruising down the parkway, zipping from here to there at any time has given way to a true nightmare that is destroying the environment, costing billions and deeply impacting our personal well-being. Getting from A to B has never been more difficult, expensive or miserable. It doesn't have to be this way. Jeffrey Tumlin's book Sustainable Transportation Planning offers easy-to-understand, clearly explained tips and techniques that will allow us to quite literally take back our roads. Essential reading for anyone who wants to drive our transportation system out of the gridlock." -Marianne Cusato, home designer and author of Get Your House Right: Architectural Elements to Use and Avoid ?The book is full of useful ideas on nearly every page.? ? Bill DiBennedetto of Triple Pundit As transportations-related disciplines of urban planning, architecture, landscape architecture, urban economics, and social policy have undergone major internal reform efforts in recent decades Written in clear, easy-to-follow language, this book provides planning practitioners with the tools they need to achieve their cities? economic development, social equity and ecological sustainability goals. Starting with detailed advice for improving each mode of transportation, the book offers guidance on balancing the needs of each mode against each other, whether on a downtown street, or a small town neighborhood, or a regional network.
Commerce Business Daily 2001
The Night Bus Hero Onjali Q. Raúf 2022-02-08 What does it take to turn a bully into a hero? Empathy and the power of forgiveness take center stage in this poignant novel by the award-winning author of The Boy at the Back of the Class. Getting in trouble is what Hector does best. He knows that not much is expected of him. In fact, he gets some of his most brilliant prank ideas while sitting in detention. But how far is too far? When Hector plays a prank on a homeless man and is seen and shamed by a schoolmate, he reaches a turning point. He wants to be viewed differently and decides to do something that will change his fate for the better. But will anyone take him seriously? This moving story told with humor and heart presents readers with some recognizable characters, like a bully and a teacher’s pet, and introduces them to some they may not be so familiar with— like those who are homeless, who live on the street, and whose stories are equally meaningful and important. Readers will feel motivated to see the best in others and hopeful that bad things can be overcome with effort.
Urban Street Design Guide National Association of City Transportation Officials 2013-10-01 The NACTO Urban Street Design Guide shows how streets of every size can be reimagined and reoriented to prioritize safe driving and transit, biking, walking, and public activity. Unlike older, more conservative engineering manuals, this design guide emphasizes the core principle that urban streets are public places and have a larger role to play in communities than solely being conduits for traffic. The well-illustrated guide offers blueprints of street design from multiple perspectives, from the bird’s eye view to granular details. Case studies from around the country clearly show how to implement best practices, as well as provide guidance for customizing design applications to a city’s unique needs. Urban Street Design Guide outlines five goals and tenets of world-class street design: • Streets are public spaces. Streets play a much larger role in the public life of cities and communities than just thoroughfares for traffic. • Great streets are great for business. Well-designed streets generate higher revenues for businesses and higher values for homeowners. • Design for safety. Traffic engineers can and should design streets where people walking, parking, shopping, bicycling, working, and driving can cross paths safely. • Streets can be changed. Transportation engineers can work flexibly within the building envelope of a street. Many city streets were created in a different era and need to be reconfigured to meet new needs. • Act now! Implement projects quickly using temporary materials to help inform public decision making. Elaborating on these fundamental principles, the guide offers substantive direction for cities seeking to improve street design to create more inclusive, multi-modal urban environments. It is an exceptional resource for redesigning streets to serve the needs of 21st century cities, whose residents and visitors demand a variety of transportation options, safer streets, and vibrant community life.

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