Cold War Space Sleuths Dominic Phelan 2012-11-28 “Space Sleuths of the Cold War” relates for the first time the inside story of the amateur spies who monitored the Soviet space program during the Cold War. It is written by many of those “space sleuths” themselves and chronicles the key moments in their discovery of hidden history. This book shows that dedicated observers were often better than professionals at interpreting that information coming out of the USSR during the dark days of the Cold War. This book takes a unique approach to the history of Soviet spaceflight – looking at the personal stories of some of the researchers as well as the space secrets the Soviets tried to keep hidden. The fascinating account often reads like a Cold War espionage novel. “Space Sleuths of the Cold War” includes an impressive list of contributors, such as: Editor Dominic Phelan, giving an overall history of the Cold War hunt for Soviet space secrets. Space writer Brian Harvey reveals his own personal search through official Soviet radio and magazines to find out what they were (and weren’t) revealing to the outside world at the height of the space race. Sven Grahn from Sweden details his own 40 year quest to understand what was happening on the other side of the Iron Curtain. Professional American historian Asif Siddiqi explores his own adventures in the once secret Russian archives – often seeing documents never before read by Westerners. Dutch cosmonaut researcher Bert Vis provides an inside account of the Yuri Gagarin training center in Moscow. Belgian researcher Bart Hendrickx’s details his important translation of the 1960s’ diaries of cosmonaut team leader General Kamanin. Pioneer space sleuth James Oberg’s shares his memories of his own notable ‘scoops.' Paris-based writer Christian Lardier recounts the efforts of French space sleuths – whose work was frequently overlooked in the USA and Britain because of the language barrier.
Russia's Cosmonauts Rex D. Hall 2007-10-05 There is no competition since this is the first book in the English language on cosmonaut selection and training Offers a unique and original discussion on how Russia prepares its cosmonauts for spaceflight. Contains original interviews and photographs with first-hand information obtained by the authors on visits to Star City Provides an insight to the role of cosmonauts in the global space programme of the future. Reviews the training both of Russian cosmonauts in other countries and of foreign cosmonauts in Star City
Dornier Do 17 Units of World War 2 Chris Goss 2019-09-19 Initially designed as a high-speed mail aeroplane and airliner, the Do 17 first made an appearance as a military aircraft in the Spanish Civil War, both as a bomber and in reconnaissance roles. In the early stages of World War II, it, together with the Heinkel He 111, formed the backbone of the German bomber arm over Poland, France, Belgium and the Low Countries, and saw action in almost every major campaign in this period. However, by the start of the Battle of Britain, the Do 17's limited range and small bomb load meant that it was ripe for replacement by the Ju 88. Though it performed well at lower altitudes, the model suffered heavy losses during raids, particularly during the Blitz and were increasingly phased out. This fully illustrated study uses detailed full-colour artwork and authoritative text from an expert author to tell the full operation story of one of Nazi Germany's best light bombers from the early years of World War II.
Beyond Earth Asif A. Siddiqi 2018 This is a completely updated and revised version of a monograph published in 2002 by the NASA History Office under the original title Deep Space Chronicle: A Chronology of Deep Space and Planetary Probes, 1958-2000. This new edition not only adds all events in robotic deep space exploration after 2000 and up to the end of 2016, but it also completely corrects and updates all accounts of missions from 1958 to 2000--Provided by publisher.
Deep Space Chronicle Asif A. Siddiqi 2002
Chariots for Apollo Courtney G. Brooks 2009-03-26 Written by a trio of experts, this is the definitive reference on the Apollo spacecraft and lunar modules. It traces the design of the vehicles, their development, and their operation in space. More than 100 photographs and illustrations highlight the text, which begins with NASA's origins and concludes with the triumphant Apollo 11 moon mission.
The Attainability of Heavenly Bodies Walter Hohmann 1960 This work (originally published in 1925) contributes to recognition of the feasibility of space travel. Treated are problems associated with leaving the earth, return to earth, free-space flight, circumnavigation of celestial objects, and landing on other celestial objects.
Apollo by the Numbers Richard W. Orloff 2000
The Moon David Schrunk 2007-11-27 This extraordinary book details how the Moon could be used as a springboard for Solar System exploration. It presents a realistic plan for placing and servicing telescopes on the Moon, and highlights the use of the Moon as a base for an early warning system from which to combat threats of near-Earth objects. A realistic vision of human development and settlement of the Moon over the next one hundred years is presented, and the author explains how global living standards for the Earth can be enhanced through the use of lunar-based generated solar power. From that beginning, the people of the Earth would evolve into a spacefaring civilisation.
Spacelab 2 1985
The Soyuz Launch Vehicle Christian Lardier 2013-03-12 “The Soyuz Launch Vehicle” tells the story, for the first time in a single English-language book, of the extremely successful Soyuz launch vehicle. Built as the world’s first intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM), Soyuz was adapted to launch not only Sputnik but also the first man to orbit Earth, and has been in service for over fifty years in a variety of forms. It has launched all Soviet manned spacecraft and is now the only means of reaching the International Space Station. It was also the workhorse for launching satellites and space probes and has recently been given a second life in French Guiana, fulfilling a commercial role in a joint venture with France. No other launch vehicle has had such a long and illustrious history. This remarkable book gives a complete and accurate description of the two lives of Soyuz, chronicling the recent cooperative space endeavors of Europe and Russia. The book is presented in two parts: Christian Lardier chronicles the “first life” in Russia while Stefan Barensky explores its “second life,” covering Starsem, the Franco-Russian company and implementation of technology for the French Guiana Space Agency by ESA. Part One has been developed from Russian sources, providing a descriptive approach to very technical issues. The second part of the book tells the contemporary story of the second life of Soyuz, gathered from Western sources and interviews with key protagonists. “The Soyuz Launch Vehicle” is a detailed description of a formidable human adventure, with its political, technical, and commercial ramifications. At a time when a new order was taking shape in the space sector, the players being the United States, Russia, Europe and Asia, and when economic difficulties sometimes made it tempting to give up, this book reminds us that in the global sector, nothing is impossible.
Praxis Manned Spaceflight Log 1961-2006 Tim Furniss 2007-02-22 This flagship work charts a complete chronological log of orbital manned spaceflight. Included are the X-15 "astroflights" of the 1960s, and the two 1961 Mercury and Redstone missions which were non-orbital. There is an image depicting each manned spaceflight, and data boxes containing brief biographies of all the space travelers. The main text is a narrative of each mission, its highlights and accomplishments, including the strange facts and humorous stories connected to every mission. The resulting book is a handy reference to all manned spaceflights, the names of astronauts and cosmonauts who flew on each mission, their roles and accomplishments.
Soviet Robots in the Solar System Wesley T. Huntress, JR. 2011-06-28 Soviet Robots in the Solar System provides a history of the Soviet robotic lunar and planetary exploration program from its inception, with the attempted launch of a lunar impactor on September 23, 1958, to the last launch in the Russian national scientific space program in the 20th Century, Mars 96, on November 16, 1996. This title makes a unique contribution to understanding the scientific and engineering accomplishments of the Soviet Union’s robotic space exploration enterprise from its infancy to its demise with the collapse of the Soviet Union. The authors provide a comprehensive account of Soviet robotic exploration of the Solar System for both popular space enthusiasts and professionals in the field. Technical details and science results are provided and put into an historical and political perspective in a single volume for the first time. The book is divided into two parts. Part I describes the key players and the key institutions that build and operate the hardware, the rockets that provide access to space, and the spacecraft that carry out the enterprise. Part II is about putting these pieces together to enable space flight and mission campaigns. Part II is written in chronological order beginning with the first launches to the Moon. Each chapter covers a particular period when specific mission campaigns were undertaken during celestially-determined launch windows. Each chapter begins with a short overview of the flight missions that occurred during the time period and the political and historical context for the flight mission campaigns, including what the Americans were doing at the time. The bulk of each chapter is devoted to the scientific and engineering details of that flight campaign. The spacecraft and payloads are examined with as much technical detail as is available today, the progress is described, and a synopsis of the scientific result is given.
Challenge to Apollo Asif A. Siddiqi 2000 The book received the Emme Award for Astronautical Literature at the March 20 2000 luncheon of the Goddard Memorial Symposium, sponsored by the American Astronautical Society. Named in honor of the first NASA Historian, Eugene Emme, the Emme award was created in 1982 to annually recognize an outstanding book that increases public understanding of the past and potential impact of the field of astronautics.
Rockets and People: Boris Chertok 2013-04-29 Much has been written in the West on the history of the Soviet space program but few Westerners have read direct first-hand accounts of the men and women who were behind the many Russian accomplishments in exploring space. The memoirs of Academician Boris Chertok, translated from the original Russian, fills that gap. Chertok began his career as an electrician in 1930 at an aviation factory near Moscow. Twenty-seven years later, he became deputy to the founding figure of the Soviet space program, the mysterious “Chief Designer” Sergey Korolev. Chertok's sixty-year-long career and the many successes and failures of the Soviet space program constitute the core of his memoirs, Rockets and People. In these writings, spread over four volumes, Academician Chertok not only describes and remembers, but also elicits and extracts profound insights from an epic story about a society's quest to explore the cosmos. In Volume 1, Chertok describes his early years as an engineer and ends with the mission to Germany after the end of World War II when the Soviets captured Nazi missile technology and expertise. Volume 2 takes up the story with the development of the world's first intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) and ends with the launch of Sputnik and the early Moon probes. In Volume 3, Chertok recollects the great successes of the Soviet space program in the 1960s including the launch of the world's first space voyager Yuriy Gagarin as well as many events connected with the Cold War. Finally, in Volume 4, Chertok meditates at length on the massive Soviet lunar project designed to beat the Americans to the Moon in the 1960s, ending with his remembrances of the Energiya-Buran project. NASA SP-2005-4110.
Lunar Exploration Paolo Ulivi 2004-04-06 Paolo Ulivi provides a well-paced, rapidly moving, balanced, even-handed account of lunar exploration as a popular history. He covers the unmanned programmes, e.g. Ranger, and other American probes in the late ‘50s and in the later chapters he looks at recent lunar exploration and future plans for the same. It’s a book that will be perfect for an enthusiast or someone coming to the story for the first time, as it does not include excessive technical depth. Uniquely drawing on recently declassified documents, detail of Chinese lunar exploration projects is provided, as well as nuclear lunar weapons of the ‘50s developed by the super powers, Soviet Russia and the United States.
How High the Sky? Thomas Gangale 2018-12-13 In How High the Sky?, jurist Thomas Gangale explores the oldest and most important controversy in space law: how far up does national airspace go, and where does the international environment of outer space begin? Even though nations did not object to the first satellites flying over their sovereign territory, after more than six decades there is still no international agreement on how low the right of space object overflight extends, nor are there agreed legal definitions of "space object" and "space activity." Dr. Gangale brings his background as an aerospace engineer to bear in exploding long-held beliefs of the legal community, and he offers a draft international convention to settle the oldest and most intractable problems in space law.
Spaceflight and the Myth of Presidential Leadership Roger D. Launius 1997 Setting the tone for the collection, NASA chief historian Roger D. Launius and Howard McCurdy maintain that the nation's presidency had become imperial by the mid-1970s and that supporters of the space program had grown to find relief in such a presidency, which they believed could help them obtain greater political support and funding. Subsequent chapters explore the roles and political leadership, vis-à-vis government policy, of presidents Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, Ford, Carter, and Reagan.
Space Rescue Shayler David 2009-03-17 Looks forward to the completion of the ISS, possibility of return to the moon, manned flights to Mars, and the prospect of safety and rescue far beyond. Describes the role of Mission Control and recovery forces in ensuring the support from the ground to the crew in space. Provides a unique range of historic archive of material on the Russian programme. Presents a review of the Columbia accident, its investigation and various proposed rescue scenarios. Details escape systems devised for rocket research aircraft, early manned spacecraft, abort and recovery options from Earth orbit, and from lunar distance. Demonstrates that crew safety has been a factor in planning and mounting on all manned spaceflights.
Apollo Richard W. Orloff 2006-08-29 This book provides an overview of the origins of the Apollo program and descriptions of the ground facilities, launch vehicles and spacecraft that were developed in the quest to reach – and return from - the surface of the moon. It will serve as an invaluable single-volume sourcebook for space enthusiasts, space historians, journalists, and others. The text includes a comprehensive collection of tables listing facts and figures for each mission.
Soviet and Russian Lunar Exploration Brian Harvey 2007-08-17 This book tells the story of the Soviet and Russian lunar programme, from its origins to the present-day federal Russian space programme. Brian Harvey describes the techniques devised by the USSR for lunar landing, from the LK lunar module to the LOK lunar orbiter and versions tested in Earth’s orbit. He asks whether these systems would have worked and examines how well they were tested. He concludes that political mismanagement rather than technology prevented the Soviet Union from landing cosmonauts on the moon. The book is well timed for the return to the moon by the United States and the first missions there by China and India.
The Race to the Moon Chronicled in Stamps, Postcards, and Postmarks Umberto Cavallaro 2018-10-05 The story of the famed race to the Moon between the US and the USSR has been told countless times. The strategies of these two superpowers have often been paralleled in a way that highlights their fight for dominance and efforts to develop needed new technologies. This book will show how beneath these surface similarities, the two competing nations employed very different core tactics. It provides a new perspective of the history of the space race by analyzing that history through philately - that is, from the images on postage stamps, post cards, and letters in circulation at that time. Through this fascinating historical visual record, the author shows how the propaganda-heavy approach of the USSR eventually lost out to the more pragmatic approach of the United States.
Apollo 8: Man Around the Moon United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Office of Public Affairs 1968
Salyut - The First Space Station Grujica S. Ivanovich 2008-10-22 This remarkable book gives a comprehensive account of the longest manned space mission of the time. It details for the first time the people involved and the crews assigned to operate the first space station Salyut. The book portrays the selection of the crews, dramatic flights and tragedy of Soyuz 11. Biographies of the Soyuz 11 cosmonauts are published for the first time in English. The book relates discussions between the key personnel, and investigates the causes of the tragedy. The book ends with memories of all those affected by the DOS program and the tragedy of Soyuz 11 and looks forward to a continuation of the historic mission of Salyut.
Moon Shot Alan Shepard 2011-05-03 New York Times bestseller for fans of First Man: A “breathtaking” insider history of NASA’s space program—from astronauts Alan Shepard and Deke Slayton (Entertainment Weekly). On October 4, 1957, the Soviet Union launched Sputnik I, and the space race was born. Desperate to beat the Russians into space, NASA put together a crew of the nation’s most daring test pilots: the seven men who were to lead America to the moon. The first into space was Alan Shepard; the last was Deke Slayton, whose irregular heartbeat kept him grounded until 1975. They spent the 1960s at the forefront of NASA’s effort to conquer space, and Moon Shot is their inside account of what many call the twentieth century’s greatest feat—landing humans on another world. Collaborating with NBC’s veteran space reporter Jay Barbree, Shepard and Slayton narrate in gripping detail the story of America’s space exploration from the time of Shepard’s first flight until he and eleven others had walked on the moon.
Mir Hardware Heritage David S. F. Portree 1995 The heritage of the major Mir complex hardware elements is described. These elements include Soyuz-TM and Progress-M ; the Kvant, Kvant 2, and Kristall modules ; and the Mir base block. Configuration changes and major mission events of Salyut 6, Salyut 7, and Mir multiport space stations are described in detail for the period 1977-1994. A comparative chronology of U.S. and Soviet/Russian manned spaceflight is also given for that period. The 68 illustrations include comparative scale drawings of U.S. and Russian spacecraft as well as sequential drawings depicting missions and mission events.
Conquest of the Moon Wernher Von Braun 1953
Japanese Missions to the International Space Station John O'Sullivan 2019-03-23 Japan has a rich history of human spaceflight, flying in space with both NASA and the Soviet/Russian space agencies over the years. This book tells the story of the JAXA astronauts who have visited the International Space Station and how they have lived on board, helped construct the space laboratory and performed valuable scientific experiments. JAXA has contributed the largest single module to the ISS: the Kibō (Hope) science laboratory with its Logistics Module, Exposed Facility and robot arm. JAXA supplies the station with cargo and supplies on its automated cargo spacecraft, the H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV), but it is the human endeavour that captures the imagination. From brief visits to six-month expeditions, from spacewalking to commanding the Earth’s only outpost in space, JAXA astronauts have played a vital role in the international project. Extensive use of colour photographs from NASA and JAXA depicting the experiments carried out and the phases of the ISS construction, together with the personal stories of the astronauts’ experiences in space, highlight the crucial part the Japanese have played in human spaceflight.
European Missions to the International Space Station John O'Sullivan 2020-05-08 The European Space Agency has a long history of human spaceflight, working with both NASA and the Soviet/Russian space agencies over the years. This book tells the story of the ESA astronauts who have visited the International Space Station and their contributions to its development and success. For example, ESA built the Columbus science laboratory, as well as the Cupola, the Leonardo PMM and the ATV supply ship. But it is the human endeavor that captures the imagination. From brief visits to six-month expeditions and spacewalking to commanding Earth’s only outpost in space and doing experiments, ESA astronauts – whose personal stories are also told – have played a vital role in the international project. Many of their efforts are documented in photographs in the book. In following up on the missions covered in this author’s earlier title, In the Footsteps of Columbus (2016), this book highlights European missions from the 2013 Volare mission of Luca Parmitano to his 2019 Beyond mission and includes first flights for Alexander Gerst, Samantha Cristoforetti, Andreas Mogensen, Tim Peake, and Thomas Pesquet.
Spies and Shuttles James E. David 2015 Author James David tells the inside story of how NASA became a strange bedfellow to the Department of Defense and the National Security Agency, performing covert operations such as flying over sensitive areas, launching secret telecommunications satellites, and missile launch testing.
Energiya-Buran Bart Hendrickx 2007-12-05 This absorbing book describes the long development of the Soviet space shuttle system, its infrastructure and the space agency’s plans to follow up the first historic unmanned mission. The book includes comparisons with the American shuttle system and offers accounts of the Soviet test pilots chosen for training to fly the system, and the operational, political and engineering problems that finally sealed the fate of Buran and ultimately of NASA’s Shuttle fleet.
Animals in Space Colin Burgess 2007-07-05 This book is as a detailed, but highly readable and balanced account of the history of animal space flights carried out by all nations, but principally the United States and the Soviet Union. It explores the ways in which animal high-altitude and space flight research impacted on space flight biomedicine and technology, and how the results - both successful and disappointing - allowed human beings to then undertake that same hazardous journey with far greater understanding and confidence. This complete and authoritative book will undoubtedly become the ultimate authority on animal space flights.
This New Ocean Loyd S. Swenson 2010-04 NASA's official history of Project Mercury, America's effort to get a man into space. Covers the development of the rocket boosters, the selection and training of the astronauts, the design of the Mercury spacecraft, the test launches, and all six manned Mercury flights, including Alan Shepard, the first American in space, and John Glenn, the first American in orbit.
The Decision to Go to the Moon John M. Logsdon 1976 The decision announced by John F. Kennedy on May 25, 1961, initiating the expedition to the moon, is now documented in full for future students of history. To John Logsdon, whose approach is that of a political scientist examining the influence of men and events on the decision-making process, the decision to land a man on the moon "before this decade is out" was wholly political rather than military, although overtones of implied defense were useful in obtaining congressional support. Moreover, he notes it was made without the support of the scientific community, although their previous research efforts were expected partially to offset this deterrent.Although the success of the Russian manned orbit and the fiasco of the Bay of Pigs invasion certainly influenced the timing, in the author's interpretation the Kennedy decision manages to escape the narrow definition of a public relations exhibition. In Kennedy's view, he emphasizes, the security of the country itself was inseparably linked to a position of prestige in world opinion. Nor was he a particular enthusiast of space exploration for its own rewards. As he remarked to one of his advisors, "If you had a scientific spectacular on this earth that would be more useful--say desalting the ocean--or something just as dramatic and convincing as space, then we would do "that.""The thoroughness of this book as a historical record is evident throughout. NASA historical records and government documents not previously released, including several Presidential papers, are used in the analysis, and the author weaves these records together with subtleties of opinion from interviews with NASA officials and such Kennedy advisors as Theodore Sorenson, McGeorge Bundy, David Bell, and Jerome Wiesner.
Into That Silent Sea Francis French 2009-09-01 A history of early space flight focuses on the careers of both American astronauts and Soviet cosmonauts and includes coverage of other persons who worked in support roles.
Project Apollo: The Tough Decisions 2005 NASA SP-2005-4537. Monographs in Aerospace History Series No. 37. Presents the history of the manned space program from September 1, 1960 to January 5, 1968. Outlines chronologically and in detail the steps taken from the early Mercury days through the operation tests conducted with Gemini, to the qualification of Apollo. Describes the key technical, operational, and management milestones and how key issues in each phase of the space program were resolved
The Rebirth of the Russian Space Program Brian Harvey 2007-05-10 This, fifty years after Sputnik, is the definitive book on the Russian space program. The author covers all the key elements of the current Russian space program, including both manned and unmanned missions. He examines the various types of unmanned applications programs as well as the crucial military program, and even analyzes the infrastructure of production, launch centres and tracking. You’ll also find discussion of the commercialization of the program and its relationship with western companies. Russia’s current space experiment is also put in a comparative global context. Strong emphasis is placed on Russia’s future space intentions and on new programs and missions in prospect.
Almanac of Soviet Manned Space Flight Dennis Newkirk 1990 Information on Soviet manned space flight from the 1960s to 1990 has been compiled in this book. The author used books, journals, and other sources, such as Soviet news broadcasts, when compiling this history. Chapters cover precursors to manned missions, humans into space (1960-1966), the Moon race, the first space stations (1973-1976), second-generation space stations (1976-1985), and Mars precursors (1986-1989). A chronological listing of space flights and illustrations of spacecraft are included.
The Soviet Manned Space Program Phillip Clark 1988 Traces the development of the Soviet space program from Sputnik to the Mir space station, and looks at future Soviet plans for the exploration of space
Critical issues in the history of spaceflight

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