Twelve Years a Slave Solomon Northup 101-01-01 "Having been born a freeman, and for more than thirty years enjoyed the blessings of liberty in a free State—and having at the end of that time been kidnapped and sold into Slavery, where I remained, until happily rescued in the month of January, 1853, after a bondage of twelve years—it has been suggested that an account of my life and fortunes would not be uninteresting to the public." -an excerpt
Cinephilia Marijke de Valck 2005 They obsess over the nuances of a Douglas Sirk or Ingmar Bergman film; they revel in books such as François Truffaut's Hitchcock; they happily subscribe to the Sundance Channel—they are the rare breed known as cinephiles. Though much has been made of the classic era of cinephilia from the 1950s to the 1970s, Cinephilia documents the latest generation of cinephiles and their use of new technologies. With the advent of home theaters, digital recording devices, online film communities, cinephiles today pursue their dedication to film outside of institutional settings. A radical new history of film culture, Cinephilia breaks new ground for students and scholars alike.
Beyond Observation Paul Henley 2020-01-07 A comprehensive history of ethnographic film since cinema began in 1895. It shows how the genre evolved out of reportage, exotic melodrama and travelogues prior to the Second World War into a more academic form of documentary in the post-war period.
Critical issues in the history of spaceflight
The History and Future of Technology Robert U. Ayres 2021 Eminent physicist and economist, Robert Ayres, examines the history of technology as a change agent in society, focusing on societal roots rather than technology as an autonomous, self-perpetuating phenomenon. With rare exceptions, technology is developed in response to societal needs that have evolutionary roots and causes. In our genus Homo, language evolved in response to a need for our ancestors to communicate, both in the moment, and to posterity. A band of hunters had no chance in competition with predators that were larger and faster without this type of organization, which eventually gave birth to writing and music. The steam engine did not leap fully formed from the brain of James Watt. It evolved from a need to pump water out of coal mines, driven by a need to burn coal instead of firewood, in turn due to deforestation. Later, the steam engine made machines and mechanization possible. Even quite simple machines increased human productivity by a factor of hundreds, if not thousands. That was the Industrial Revolution. If we count electricity and the automobile as a second industrial revolution, and the digital computer as the beginning of a third, the world is now on the cusp of a fourth revolution led by microbiology. These industrial revolutions have benefited many in the short term, but devastated the Earths ecosystems. Can technology save the human race from the catastrophic consequences of its past success? That is the question this book will try to answer.
Killing Time Nicholas J Saunders 2011-11-08 The Great War of 1914-1918 now stands at the furthest edge of living memory. And yet, hardly a month passes without some dramatic and sometimes tragic discovery being made along the old killing fields of the Western Front. Graves of British soldiers buried during battle – still lying in rows seemingly arm in arm or found crouching at the entrance to a dugout; whole ‘underground cities’ of trenches, dugouts and shelters have been preserved in the mud; field hospitals carved out of the chalk country of the Somme marked with graffiti; unexploded bombs and gas canisters – all of these are the poignant and sometimes deadly legacies of a war we can never forget. Killing Time digs beneath the surface of war to uncover the living reality left behind. Nicholas J. Saunders brings together a wealth of discoveries to offer fresh insights into the human and often barbaric aspect of warfare. He uses discoveries in the trenches, family photographs, diaries and souvenirs to give the dead a voice. You cannot fail to be fascinated and moved by what he unearths.
Virtual Art Oliver Grau 2004-09-17 An overview of the art historical antecedents to virtual reality and the impact of virtual reality on contemporary conceptions of art. Although many people view virtual reality as a totally new phenomenon, it has its foundations in an unrecognized history of immersive images. Indeed, the search for illusionary visual space can be traced back to antiquity. In this book, Oliver Grau shows how virtual art fits into the art history of illusion and immersion. He describes the metamorphosis of the concepts of art and the image and relates those concepts to interactive art, interface design, agents, telepresence, and image evolution. Grau retells art history as media history, helping us to understand the phenomenon of virtual reality beyond the hype. Grau shows how each epoch used the technical means available to produce maximum illusion. He discusses frescoes such as those in the Villa dei Misteri in Pompeii and the gardens of the Villa Livia near Primaporta, Renaissance and Baroque illusion spaces, and panoramas, which were the most developed form of illusion achieved through traditional methods of painting and the mass image medium before film. Through a detailed analysis of perhaps the most important German panorama, Anton von Werner's 1883 The Battle of Sedan, Grau shows how immersion produced emotional responses. He traces immersive cinema through Cinerama, Sensorama, Expanded Cinema, 3-D, Omnimax and IMAX, and the head mounted display with its military origins. He also examines those characteristics of virtual reality that distinguish it from earlier forms of illusionary art. His analysis draws on the work of contemporary artists and groups ART+COM, Maurice Benayoun, Charlotte Davies, Monika Fleischmann, Ken Goldberg, Agnes Hegedues, Eduardo Kac, Knowbotic Research, Laurent Mignonneau, Michael Naimark, Simon Penny, Daniela Plewe, Paul Sermon, Jeffrey Shaw, Karl Sims, Christa Sommerer, and Wolfgang Strauss. Grau offers not just a history of illusionary space but also a theoretical framework for analyzing its phenomenologies, functions, and strategies throughout history and into the future.
Amsterdam Russell Shorto 2014 A historical portrait of the Netherlands capital and the ideas that make it unique explores the ongoing efforts of its citizens to navigate its seaside challenges and democratic philosophies, revealing how the liberal ideals that evolved there throughout time have had a profound influence and are being compromised in today's world.
Celestial Sleuth Donald W. Olson 2013-10-02 For a general audience interested in solving mysteries in art, history, and literature using the methods of science, 'forensic astronomy' is a thrilling new field of exploration. Astronomical calculations are the basis of the studies, which have the advantage of bringing to readers both evocative images and a better understanding of the skies. Weather facts, volcano studies, topography, tides, historical letters and diaries, famous paintings, military records, and the friendly assistance of experts in related fields add variety, depth, and interest to the work. The chosen topics are selected for their wide public recognition and intrigue, involving artists such as Vincent van Gogh, Claude Monet, Edvard Munch, and Ansel Adams; historical events such as the Battle of Marathon, the death of Julius Caesar, the American Revolution, and World War II; and literary authors such as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Joyce, and Mary Shelley. This book sets out to answer these mysteries indicated with the means and expertise of astronomy, opening the door to a richer experience of human culture and its relationship with nature. Each subject is carefully analyzed. As an example using the study of sky paintings by Vincent van Gogh, the analytical method would include: - computer calculations of historical skies above France in the 19th century - finding and quoting the clues found in translations of original letters by Van Gogh - making site visits to France to determine the precise locations when Van Gogh set up his easel and what celestial objects are depicted. For each historical event influenced by astronomy, there would be a different kind of mystery to be solved. As an example: - How can the phase of the Moon and time of moonrise help to explain a turning point of the American Civil War - the fatal wounding of Stonewall Jackson at Chancellorsville in 1863? For each literary reference to astronomy, it was determined which celestial objects were being described and making an argument that the author is describing an actual event. For example, what was the date of the moonlit scene when Mary Shelley first had the idea for her novel “Frankenstein?” These and more fun riddles will enchant and delight the fan of art and astronomy.
The African Experience Vincent Khapoya 2015-07-14 This book examines the role that Africa has played on the world stage, the African Union, the African leaders' efforts to take care of their own problems and lessen their dependence on the United States and European countries.
A History of Experimental Film and Video A.L. Rees 2019-07-25 Avant-garde film is almost indefinable. It is in a constant state of change and redefinition. In his highly-acclaimed history of experimental film, A.L. Rees tracks the movement of the film avant-garde between the cinema and modern art (with its postmodern coda). But he also reconstitutes the film avant-garde as an independent form of art practice with its own internal logic and aesthetic discourse. In this revised and updated edition, Rees introduces experimental film and video to new readers interested in the wider cinema, as well as offering a guide to enthusiasts of avant-garde film and new media arts. Ranging from Cézanne and Dada, via Cocteau, Brakhage and Le Grice, to the new wave of British film and video artists from the 1990s to the present day, this expansive study situates avant-garde film between the cinema and the gallery, with many links to sonic as well as visual arts. The new edition includes a review of current scholarship in avant-garde film history and includes updated reading and viewing lists. It also features a new introduction and concluding chapter, which assess the rise of video projection in the gallery since the millennium, and describe new work by the latest generation of experimental film-makers. The new edition is richly illustrated with images of the art works discussed.
The Global Theme Park Industry Salvador Anton Clavé 2007 Since the 1980s, the theme park industry has developed into a global phenomenon, with everything from large, worldwide theme parks to countless smaller ventures. From the first pleasure gardens to the global theme park companies, this book provides an understanding of the nature and function of theme parks as spaces of entertainment. Illustrated throughout by worldwide case studies, empirical data and practical examples, the book portrays the impacts of theme park as global competitive actors, agents of global development and cultural symbols, particularly in the context of their role in the developing experience economy. In conclusion, this book is a practical guide to the planning and development of theme parks.
Ferran Adria Brett Littman 2014-03-01 This publication accompanies the first major museum exhibition in the world to focus on the visualization and drawing practices of master chef Ferran Adria. His complex body of work positions the drawing medium as both a philosophical tool--used to organize and convey knowledge, meaning and signification--as well as a physical object--used to synthesize over twenty years of innovation within the kitchen. Emphasizing the role of drawing in Adria's quest to understand creativity, the book features an interview between Ferran Adria and Brett Littman, and also includes a reprint of the artist Richard Hamilton's essay about the relationship of food to contemporary art and Adria's participation in Documenta 12 that first appeared in "Food for Thought: Thought for Food" (2009).
Lost Restaurants of Tucson Rita Connelly 2015-12-07 From western roadhouses to fine dining, Tucson boasts an extraordinary lineup of diverse restaurants. Though some of its greatest no longer exist, their stories conjure the sights, smells and sounds of the city’s history. Longtime locals still buzz about Gordo’s famous chimichangas, an accidental dish originating in Tucson. The legendary Tack Room was a beacon of fine dining. Places like Café Terra Cotta and Fuego pioneered a new southwestern cuisine, serving regional dishes like prickly pear pork and stuffed poblanos. University of Arizona alumni miss old spots like the Varsity, while long-gone haunts like Gus & Andy’s attracted a unique crowd of businessmen, movie stars and the occasional mobster. Join local food writer Rita Connelly as she serves up savory stories of good food and good company from the gone but never forgotten favorites of the Old Pueblo.
La Cuisine Française François Tanty 1893
The Torchbearers Karen J. Blair 1994-02-22 "Blair's meticulous research has produced a complex work that is both encyclopedic and lively." -- The Journal of American History "With its valuable bibliography, this book should be an essential purchase for most libraries." -- Choice "With its detailed examination of both local and national organizations, this volume is a valuable addition both to the growing literature on women's associations and to the development of nonprofit enterprise in the arts." -- ARNOVA News "... Blair's insistence on the significance of her subject and her skillfully researched treatment of it is welcome and useful." -- American Historical Review "Readers interested in women's history, American cultural hsitory, and popular culture should all enjoy this book." -- Illinois Historical Journal "An indispensible overview of women's cultural activities in promoting and popularizing a wide variety of cultural enterprises, from music to artists' colonies." -- Kathleen D. McCarthy The women's arts clubs that flourished during the Progressive Era were more than havens for artistic dilettantes. As advocacy groups they effectively promoted universal access to the fine arts, leaving a vital legacy of cultural programs and institutions.
Goldfinger Ian Fleming 2017-07-11 “Keep away from MR. AURIC GOLDFINGER. He is a most powerful man. If he wished to crush you, he would only have to roll over in his sleep to do so.” OPERATION GRAND SLAM Secret agent James Bond had been warned not to tangle with Goldfinger. But the super-criminal’s latest obsession was too strong, too dangerous. He had to be stopped. Goldfinger was determined to take possession of half the supply of mined gold in the world—to rob Fort Knox! For this incredible venture he had enlisted the aid of the top criminals in the U.S., including a bevy of beautiful thieves from the Bronx. And he had conceived so foolproof a plan that it would take all of Bond’s unique talents to make it fail—as fail it must. JAMES BOND challenges GOLDFINGER, THE MOST EVIL GENIUS HE HAS EVER FACED. He’s a phenomenal criminal who likes his women dressed only in gold paint. He’s a magnificent fiend who carries his cash in gold bars. He’s a powerful villain who plans to pull the biggest and boldest crime in history—the robbery of all the gold in Fort Knox. “It’s all marvellously intricate and polished storytelling, all absurdly impossible, all superlative fun.”—Cleveland News. “We recommend Goldfinger for just what it is: sophisticated, tongue-in-cheek entertainment par excellence.”—Playboy Magazine. “If you like heroes heroic, a woman who proves, finally, that she’s all woman, and a villain who is a dirty dog, then Goldfinger is for you.”—Detroit Sunday Times.
Augmented Reality in Tourism, Museums and Heritage Vladimir Geroimenko 2021 This book provides extensive research into the use of augmented reality in the three interconnected and overlapping fields of the tourism industry, museum exhibitions, and cultural heritage. It is written by a virtual team of 50 leading researchers and practitioners from 16 countries around the world. The authors explore the opportunities and challenges of augmented reality applications, their current status and future trends, informal learning and heritage preservation, mixed reality environments and immersive installations, cultural heritage education and tourism promotion, visitors with special needs, and emerging post-COVID-19 museums and heritage sites. Augmented Reality in Tourism, Museums and Heritage: A New Technology to Inform and Entertain is essential reading not only for researchers, application developers, educators, museum curators, tourism and cultural heritage promoters, but also for students (both graduates and undergraduates) and anyone who is interested in the efficient and practical use of augmented reality technology.
Postsingular Rudy Rucker 2009-02-03 After a bizarre scheme on the part of a ruthless computer billionaire and a wacky U.S. president to radically alter the world through sentient nanotechnology goes awry thanks to an autistic boy, mysterious giant humanoids from another quantum universe arrive on Earth with plans to tidy up humankind's mess. Reprint. 10,000 first printing.
The Rapture of the Nerds Cory Doctorow 2012-09-04 A tale set at the end of the twenty-first century finds the planet's divided hominid population subjected to the forces of a splintery metaconsciousness that inundates networks with plans for cataclysmic technologies, prompting an unwitting jury member to participate in a grueling decision.
Colonial Situations George W. Stocking 1991-10-01 As European colonies in Asia and Africa became independent nations, as the United States engaged in war in Southeast Asia and in covert operations in South America, anthropologists questioned their interactions with their subjects and worried about the political consequences of government-supported research. By 1970, some spoke of anthropology as “the child of Western imperialism” and as “scientific colonialism.” Ironically, as the link between anthropology and colonialism became more widely accepted within the discipline, serious interest in examining the history of anthropology in colonial contexts diminished. This volume is an effort to initiate a critical historical consideration of the varying “colonial situations” in which (and out of which) ethnographic knowledge essential to anthropology has been produced. The essays comment on ethnographic work from the middle of the nineteenth century to nearly the end of the twentieth, in regions from Oceania through southeast Asia, the Andaman Islands, and southern Africa to North and South America. The “colonial situations” also cover a broad range, from first contact through the establishment of colonial power, from District Officer administrations through white settler regimes, from internal colonialism to international mandates, from early “pacification” to wars of colonial liberation, from the expropriation of land to the defense of ecology. The motivations and responses of the anthropologists discussed are equally varied: the romantic resistance of Maclay and the complicity of Kubary in early colonialism; Malinowski’s salesmanship of academic anthropology; Speck’s advocacy of Indian land rights; Schneider’s grappling with the ambiguities of rapport; and Turner’s facilitation of Kaiapo cinematic activism. “Provides fresh insights for those who care about the history of science in general and that of anthropology in particular, and a valuable reference for professionals and graduate students.”—Choice “Among the most distinguished publications in anthropology, as well as in the history of social sciences.”—George Marcus, Anthropologica
Inspiring Thirst Kermit Lynch 2004 One of the world'¬?s most revered wine merchants and importers, Kermit Lynch changed the way Americans drink wine and the way the French make it. His retail shop in Berkeley, California, is a legendary mecca for people who enjoy good wine. Lynch is also a greatly admired writer on the subject. His monthly brochure has been the medium for expressing his philosophy since the early seventies, offering readers not only a wine education, but entry into moldy old cellars and glittering three-star restaurants. It is full of passion, principle, and humor, and peopled by a cast of characters like Patricia Wells, Richard Olney, Lulu Peyraud, Jim Harrison, and many more. In INSPIRING THIRST, Lynch presents under one cover the best of his engaging, highly personal (sometimes cantankerous) accounts of winemakers and their rare potions. Illustrated by the photographs of Gail Skoff, here is a thirst-inspiring treat for wine lovers.An anthology of wine writing from one of the world'¬?s most revered wine merchants and importers, selected from more than 30 years of his monthly brochure (national circulation 25,000), and illustrated by the photographs of Gail Skoff.Kermit Lynch'¬?s wines are available across the United States.Kermit Lynch'¬?s first book, Adventures Along the Wine Route, is in its 11th printing and won the Veuve Cliquot Wine Book of the Year Award. Hugh Johnson said "I am simply thrilled by it. I am bowled over by his blend of poetry and candour." Alice Waters said it "has given wine a new dimension for me."Reviews"Mr. Lynch never engaged in the sort of contrived tasting notes that often pass for wine writing today. Instead, he wrote of the joy and pleasures of consuming good wine, of the winemakers he met and the places he visited. He provided characters, context, and travelogue, and even recipes. In 2004, many of these pieces were gathered into a book, appropriately called Inspiring Thirst."-New York Times"[INSPIRING THIRST] Should be required reading for devotees of nature'¬?s poetry in a bottle."-Publishers Weekly"This book is a treasure: a compulsively readable collection by the revolutionary wine merchant who, almost single-handedly, has brought about a new understanding of wine as a unique expression of land, tradition, and people."-Alice Waters, owner, Chez Panisse Restaurant"For American wine lovers, Kermit Lynch belongs in the same company as Julia Child; he is a pioneer in rediscovering the vinous treasures of the Old World and making them accessible to the rest of us. These original notes from his thirty-year master class are whimsical, passionate, erudite, and eminently thirst inspiring."-Jay McInerney, author of Bacchus & Me"A wine lover opening this book will feel like a child entering a pastry shop. You can read it straight through or dip into it, treat yourself to a vivid vignette about the family Peyraud at Domaine Tempier, turn to an essay on the mysteries of "vintage chart mentality," or savor a tasting note about a wine you loved in the 1980s that perhaps you still possess in your cellar. Besides inspiring thirst and the love of wine, the book will also introduce you to the taste and exceptional personality of a man for whom wine is likemusic: a complete work of art."-Aubert de Villaine"For over 30 years, Kermit Lynch has opened his cellar for public consumption-all of it tasted, tracked, and deliberated over in his newsletter, and now memorialized for us in this anthology. Part memoir, cookbook, tasting journal, photographic reflection (via Gail Skoff's aesthetic vision), and homage to wine's people and terroirs, it is above all a manifesto of the genuine and the antithesis of wine-speak."-Paul Bertolli, author of Cooking by Hand"Kermit Lynch is the wine retailer of one's dreams-a man who will take you in and turn you on to the great vinous treasures of the universe; a man who inspires you to taste a world you hardly knew existed; a man devoted to your pleasure by inviting you to share in his. This book is proof that great wine is meant to be reveled in and shared. Don't miss it."-Karen MacNeil, author of The Wine Bible
Occupation Culture Alan W. Moore 2015-08-20 Occupation Culture is the story of a journey through the world of recent political squatting in Europe, told by a veteran of the 1970s and '80s New York punk art scene. It is also a kind of scholar adventure story. Alan W. Moore sees with the trained eye of a cultural historian, pointing out pasts, connections and futures in the creative direct action of today's social movements. Occupation Culture is based on five years of travel and engaged research. It explicates the aims, ideals and gritty realities of squatting. Despite its stature as a leading social movement of the late twentieth century, squatting has only recently received scholarly attention. The rich histories of creative work that this movement enabled are almost entirely unknown.
The Onion Book of Known Knowledge The Onion 2012-10-23 Are you a witless cretin with no reason to live? Would you like to know more about every piece of knowledge ever? Do you have cash? Then congratulations, because just in time for the death of the print industry as we know it comes the final book ever published, and the only one you will ever need: The Onion's compendium of all things known. Replete with an astonishing assemblage of facts, illustrations, maps, charts, threats, blood, and additional fees to edify even the most simple-minded book-buyer, THE ONION BOOK OF KNOWN KNOWLEDGE is packed with valuable information-such as the life stages of an Aunt; places to kill one's self in Utica, New York; and the dimensions of a female bucket, or "pail." With hundreds of entries for all 27 letters of the alphabet, THE ONION BOOK OF KNOWN KNOWLEDGE must be purchased immediately to avoid the sting of eternal ignorance.
The Return of Traditional Food Patricia Lysaght 2013
Designing Connected Products Claire Rowland 2015-05-18 Networked thermostats, fitness monitors, and door locks show that the Internet of Things can (and will) enable new ways for people to interact with the world around them. But designing connected products for consumers brings new challenges beyond conventional software UI and interaction design. This book provides experienced UX designers and technologists with a clear and practical roadmap for approaching consumer product strategy and design in this novel market. By drawing on the best of current design practice and academic research, Designing Connected Products delivers sound advice for working with cross-device interactions and the complex ecosystems inherent in IoT technology.
Maine to Greenland Wilfred E. Richard 2014-08-05 Maine to Greenland is a testament to one of the world's great geographic regions: the Maritime Far Northeast. For more than three decades, William W. Fitzhugh and Wilfred E. Richard have explored the Northeast’s Atlantic corridor and its fascinating history, habitat, and culture. The authors’ powerful personal essays and Richard’s stunning photography transport readers to this vibrant region, joining Smithsonian archaeological expeditions and trekking in vast and amazing terrain. Following Fitzhugh and Richard’s travels north—from Maine to the Canadian Maritimes, Newfoundland and northern Quebec, then to Labrador, Baffin and Ellesmere islands, and Greenland—we view incredible landscapes, uncover human history, and meet luminous personalities along the way. Fully illustrated with 350 full-color photographs, Maine to Greenland is the first in-depth treatment of the Northeast Atlantic corridor and essential for armchair travelers, locals, tourists, or anyone who has journeyed there. Today green technology, climate change, and the opening of the Arctic Ocean have transformed the Maritime Far Northeast from an icy frontier into a global resource zone and an increasingly integrated international crossroads. In our rapidly converging world, we have much to learn from the Maritime Far Northeast and how its variety of cultures have adapted to rather than changed their environments during the past ten thousand years. Maine to Greenland is not only a complete account of the region’s unique culture and environment, but also a timely reminder that amidst the very real consequences of climate change, the inhabitants of the Maritime Far Northeast can show us grounded and sustainable ways of living.
Smart cities Netexplo
Cultivating Music in America Ralph P. Locke 1997-01-01 "The Victorian cup on my shelf--a present from my mother--reads 'Love the Giver.' Is it because the very word patronage implies the authority of the father that we have treated American women patrons and activists so unlovingly in the writing of our own history? This pioneering collection of superb scholarship redresses that imbalance. At the same time it brilliantly documents the interrelationship between various aspects of gender and the creation of our own culture."--Judith Tick, author of Ruth Crawford Seeger: A Composer's Search for American Music "Together with the fine-grained and energetic research, I like the spirit of this book, which is ambitious, bold, and generous minded. Cultivating Music in America corrects long-standing prejudices, omissions, and misunderstandings about the role of women in setting up the structures of America's musical life, and, even more far-reaching, it sheds light on the character of American musical life itself. To read this book is to be brought to a fresh understanding of what is at stake when we discuss notions such as 'elitism, ' 'democratic taste, ' and the political and economic implications of art."--Richard Crawford, author of The American Musical Landscape "We all know we are indebted to royal patronage for the music of Mozart. But who launched American talent? The answer is women, this book teaches us. Music lovers will be grateful for these ten essays, sound in scholarship, that make a strong case for the women philanthropists who ought to join Carnegie and Rockefeller as household words as sponsors of music."--Karen J. Blair, author of The Torchbearers: Women and Their Amateur Arts Associations in America
Biology of Tardigrades Roberto Bertolani 1987
On the Threshold of Beauty Kees Tazelaar 2014-04-30 On the Threshold of Beauty' is an exciting and detailed reconstruction of the emergence of electronic music in the Netherlands. Author Kees Tazelaar, composer and head of the Institute of Sonology at the Royal Conservatoire in The Hague, grippingly relates its turbulent history from the earliest beginnings. This history begins around 1930 with the studio of the Philips Physics Laboratory and the plans for the Philips pavilion at Expo 58 in Brussels. The goal was a light and sound demonstration for the general public, but the involvement of Le Corbusier, Iannis Xenakis and Edgard Varèse gave this project a highly avant-garde turn. The result, Poème électronique, was considered by many to be much more experimental than the music of the research laboratory. In 1960 Philips divested itself of the studio. It was absorbed into a new studio at Utrecht University, where Gottfried Michael Koenig became artistic director in 1964. Tazelaar also looks in detail at the influence wielded by the Contact Organization for Electronic Music during this period. -- Publisher.
Black, White, and The Grey Mashama Bailey 2021-01-12 A story about the trials and triumphs of a Black chef from Queens, New York, and a White media entrepreneur from Staten Island who built a relationship and a restaurant in the Deep South, hoping to bridge biases and get people talking about race, gender, class, and culture. “Black, White, and The Grey blew me away.”—David Chang In this dual memoir, Mashama Bailey and John O. Morisano take turns telling how they went from tentative business partners to dear friends while turning a dilapidated formerly segregated Greyhound bus station into The Grey, now one of the most celebrated restaurants in the country. Recounting the trying process of building their restaurant business, they examine their most painful and joyous times, revealing how they came to understand their differences, recognize their biases, and continuously challenge themselves and each other to be better. Through it all, Bailey and Morisano display the uncommon vulnerability, humor, and humanity that anchor their relationship, showing how two citizens commit to playing their own small part in advancing equality against a backdrop of racism.
Guide to California Planning William B. Fulton 1991
The Memory of the Second World War in Soviet and Post-Soviet Russia David L. Hoffmann 2021-08-27 This volume showcases important new research on World War II memory, both in the Soviet Union and in Russia today. Through an examination of war remembrance in its various forms—official histories, school textbooks, museums, monuments, literature, films, and Victory Day parades—chapters illustrate how the heroic narrative of the war was established in Soviet times and how it continues to shape war memorialization under Putin. This war narrative resonates with the Russian population due to decades of Soviet commemoration, which continued virtually uninterrupted into the post-Soviet period. Major themes of the volume include the use of World War II memory for political legitimation and patriotic mobilization; the striking continuities between Soviet and post-Soviet commemorative practices; the place of Holocaust memorialization in contemporary Russia; Putin’s invocation of the war to bolster national pride and international prestige; and the relationship between individual memory and collective remembrance. Authored by an international group of distinguished specialists, this collection is ideal for scholars of Russia across a range of disciplines, including history, political science, sociology, and cultural studies.
Strategic Planning for Public Relations Ronald D. Smith 2007-07-10 First published in 2004. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
The Cultivation of Taste Christel Lane 2014-02-14 After many decades, if not centuries, of neglect of fine food and high-level restaurants in Britain, we are seeing a massive explosion of interest in food, cooking, and dining out. Christel Lane's book charts the process of this transformation and examines top contemporary restaurants and their chefs. The Cultivation of Taste presents a comparative study of Michelin-starred restaurants in Britain and Germany, focusing on two countries without an indigenous haute cuisine but which nevertheless have developed internationally reputed fine-dining sectors, and comparing their development to the fine-dining culture in France. Written from a sociological perspective, chefs are portrayed as part of a complex network, in their relationships with their employees, their customers, gastronomic critics, suppliers of food, and even their financiers. It will appeal to academics in the areas of economic and cultural sociology, and those with an interest in small entrepreneurial firms and their work relations, but also to all those who have an interest in fine-dining restaurants and the chef patrons at the centre of them. The book draws on a large number of interviews with renowned chefs, diners, and Michelin inspectors to provide an unprecedented insight into what goes on in Michelin-starred restaurants—what makes their chefs tick, intrigues their critics, and beguiles or annoys their customers. Restaurants are viewed not simply as businesses but as cultural enterprises that shape our taste in food, ambience, and sociality.
Bryophyte Ecology A. Smith 1982-08-19 There has been an increasing interest in bryophyte ecology over the past 100 or so years, initially of a phytosociological nature but, additionally, in recent years, of an experimental nature as well. Early studies of bryophyte communities have led to detailed investigations into the relationships between the plants and their environment. Ecological papers, the large number of which is evidenced by the length of the bibliographies in the subsequent chapters, have appeared in numerous journals. Yet, apart from review chapters, by H. Gams and P. W. Richards in Manual of Bryology, edited b:; H. Verdoorn in 1932 and chapters in E. V. Watson's Structure and Life of Bryophytes, Prem Puri's Bryophytes - A Broad Perspective and D. H. S. Richardson's The Biology of Mosses, published in 1972,1973 and 1981 respectively, no general accounts of bryophyte ecology have been published. Although the Bryophyta is a relatively small division of plants, with between 14000 and 21000 species the interest that they have aroused is out of all proportion to the size either of the plants or of the division. It is evident, however, that despite their relative insigni ficance they play an important ecological role, especially in extreme environments and, in the case of bryophytes in tropical cloud forests and of Sphagnum, may even be a dominant factor in the ecology of the area concerned.
The Biology of Tardigrades I. A. Kinchin 1994 The Biology of Tardigrades is the only modern comprehensive account of marine and freshwater tardigrades. It contains the first taxonomic review for over a decade in addition to covering every aspect of their biology.
Exhibiting War Jennifer Wellington 2017-09-30 A comparative study of how museum exhibitions in Britain, Canada and Australia were used to depict the First World War.
Designing for Emerging Technologies Jonathan Follett 2014-11-07 The recent digital and mobile revolutions are a minor blip compared to the next wave of technological change, as everything from robot swarms to skin-top embeddable computers and bio printable organs start appearing in coming years. In this collection of inspiring essays, designers, engineers, and researchers discuss their approaches to experience design for groundbreaking technologies. Design not only provides the framework for how technology works and how it’s used, but also places it in a broader context that includes the total ecosystem with which it interacts and the possibility of unintended consequences. If you’re a UX designer or engineer open to complexity and dissonant ideas, this book is a revelation. Contributors include: Stephen Anderson, PoetPainter, LLC Lisa Caldwell, Brazen UX Martin Charlier, Independent Design Consultant Jeff Faneuff, Carbonite Andy Goodman, Fjord US Camille Goudeseune, Beckman Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Bill Hartman, Essential Design Steven Keating, MIT Media Lab, Mediated Matter Group Brook Kennedy, Virginia Tech Dirk Knemeyer, Involution Studios Barry Kudrowitz, University of Minnesota Gershom Kutliroff, Omek Studio at Intel Michal Levin, Google Matt Nish-Lapidus, Normative Erin Rae Hoffer, Autodesk Marco Righetto, SumAll Juhan Sonin, Involution Studios Scott Stropkay, Essential Design Scott Sullivan, Adaptive Path Hunter Whitney, Hunter Whitney and Associates, Inc. Yaron Yanai, Omek Studio at Intel

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