Cambodge Penny Edwards 2007-01-01 This study of Cambodian nationalism brings to life eight turbulent decades of cultural change and sheds new light on the colonial ancestry of Pol Pot's murderous dystopia. Penny Edwards re-creates the intellectual milieux and cultural traffic linking Europe and empire, interweaving analysis of key movements and ideas in the French Protectorate of Cambodge with contemporary developments in the Metropole. With its fresh take on the dynamics of colonialism and nationalism, Cambodge: The Cultivation of a Nation, 1860-1945 will become essential reading for scholars of history, politics, and society in Southeast Asia. Edwards' analysis of Buddhism and her consideration of Angkor's emergence as a national monument will be of particular interest to students of Asian and European religion, museology, heritage studies, and art history. It will also appeal to specialists in modern French history, cultural studies, and colonialism, as well as readers with a general interest in Cambodia.
Complete Catalog of Books in All Fields Dover Publications, Inc 1997
My Home in Tasmania Mrs. Charles Meredith 1843
Pandaemonium 1660–1886 Humphrey Jennings 2012-10-04 Collecting texts taken from letters, diaries, literature, scientific journals and reports, Pandæmonium gathers a beguiling narrative as it traces the development of the machine age in Britain. Covering the years between 1660 and 1886, it offers a rich tapestry of human experience, from eyewitness reports of the Luddite Riots and the Peterloo Massacre to more intimate accounts of child labour, Utopian communities, the desecration of the natural world, ground-breaking scientific experiments, and the coming of the railways. Humphrey Jennings, co-founder of the Mass Observation movement of the 1930s and acclaimed documentary film-maker, assembled an enthralling narrative of this key period in Britain’s national consciousness. The result is a highly original artistic achievement in its own right. Thanks to the efforts of his daughter, Marie-Louise Jennings, Pandæmonium was originally published in 1985, and in 2012 it was the inspiration behind Danny Boyle’s electrifying Opening Ceremony for the London Olympic Games. Frank Cottrell Boyce, who wrote the scenario for the ceremony, contributes a revealing new foreword for this edition.
The Heaven Virus Clifford A. Pickover 2007-04 The New York Times writes, "Pickover contemplates realms beyond our known reality." From one of the most original voices in imaginative nonfiction comes a stunning novel of speculation on the afterlife, immortality, and the existence of the human soul. "The Heaven Virus" is inspired by virtual universes making headlines today and offers readers a glimpse of ultimate spiritual technologies for the 22nd century and a mystic encounter in an age of electronic gods. "The Heaven Virus" blends humor, psychedelia, and hope in a meditation on the outer limits of our culture, evolutionary destiny, and inner space. This novel will draw readers who have wondered about their own passage from this existence into the world to come. Cliff Pickover is the author of forty books on science, mathematics, art, religion. He received his Ph.D. from Yale University. His website, Pickover.com, has received several million visits.
Anatomy: A Love Story Dana Schwartz 2022-01-18 *INSTANT #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER* *INSTANT #1 INDIE BESTSELLER* *INSTANT USA TODAY BESTSELLER* *A REESE'S YA BOOK CLUB PICK* "Schwartz's magical novel is at once gripping and tender, and the intricate plot is engrossing as the reader tries to solve the mystery. She doesn't miss a beat in either the characterization or action, scattering clues with a delicate, precise hand. This is, in the end, the story of the anatomy of the human heart." - Booklist (starred review) Dana Schwartz’s Anatomy: A Love Story is a gothic tale full of mystery and romance. Hazel Sinnett is a lady who wants to be a surgeon more than she wants to marry. Jack Currer is a resurrection man who’s just trying to survive in a city where it’s too easy to die. When the two of them have a chance encounter outside the Edinburgh Anatomist’s Society, Hazel thinks nothing of it at first. But after she gets kicked out of renowned surgeon Dr. Beecham’s lectures for being the wrong gender, she realizes that her new acquaintance might be more helpful than she first thought. Because Hazel has made a deal with Dr. Beecham: if she can pass the medical examination on her own, Beecham will allow her to continue her medical career. Without official lessons, though, Hazel will need more than just her books—she’ll need corpses to study. Lucky that she’s made the acquaintance of someone who digs them up for a living. But Jack has his own problems: strange men have been seen skulking around cemeteries, his friends are disappearing off the streets, and the dreaded Roman Fever, which wiped out thousands a few years ago, is back with a vengeance. Nobody important cares—until Hazel. Now, Hazel and Jack must work together to uncover the secrets buried not just in unmarked graves, but in the very heart of Edinburgh society.
Los Angeles Magazine 2003-11 Los Angeles magazine is a regional magazine of national stature. Our combination of award-winning feature writing, investigative reporting, service journalism, and design covers the people, lifestyle, culture, entertainment, fashion, art and architecture, and news that define Southern California. Started in the spring of 1961, Los Angeles magazine has been addressing the needs and interests of our region for 48 years. The magazine continues to be the definitive resource for an affluent population that is intensely interested in a lifestyle that is uniquely Southern Californian.
The Rough Guide to Ecuador Harry Ades 2010-01-04 The Rough Guide to Ecuador is the essential travel guide with clear maps and coverage of Ecuador's unforgettable attractions. Whether exploring the magnificence of Quito's colonial centre, haggling in its highland markets of Zumbahua or navigating the rivers of the Amazon rainforest, the Rough Guide steers you to the best hotels, restaurants, stylish bars, caf�s, nightlife and shopping in Ecuador across every price range. You'll find detailed coverage on staying safe in Ecuador, practical advice on where to learn Spanish and how to climb Cotopaxi, as well as expert discussions for Ecuador's history, culture and environmental issues. The Rough Guide to Ecuador also includes an in-depth account of the Gal�pagos Islands that inspired Darwin, plus a wildlife guide. With handy information on how to discover Ecuador's best-preserved Inca ruins at Ingapirca or the windswept grassland wilderness of the p�ramo, the guide provides definitive information on all corners of this colourful and diverse country, relying on the clearest maps of any guide and practical language tips. Make the most of your holiday with The Rough Guide to Ecuador.
India Impressions Walter Crane 1908
At Last Charles Kingsley 1882
A Certain Age Rudolf Mrázek 2009-01-01 A Certain Age is an unconventional, evocative work of history and a moving reflection on memory, modernity, space, time, and the limitations of traditional historical narratives. Rudolf Mrázek visited Indonesia throughout the 1990s, recording lengthy interviews with elderly intellectuals in and around Jakarta. With few exceptions, they were part of an urban elite born under colonial rule and educated at Dutch schools. From the early twentieth century, through the late colonial era, the national revolution, and well into independence after 1945, these intellectuals injected their ideas of modernity, progress, and freedom into local and national discussion. When Mrázek began his interviews, he expected to discuss phenomena such as the transition from colonialism to postcolonialism. His interviewees, however, wanted to share more personal recollections. Mrázek illuminates their stories of the past with evocative depictions of their late-twentieth-century surroundings. He brings to bear insights from thinkers including Walter Benjamin, Bertold Brecht, Le Corbusier, and Marcel Proust, and from his youth in Prague, another metropolis with its own experience of passages and revolution. Architectural and spatial tropes organize the book. Thresholds, windowsills, and sidewalks come to seem more apt as descriptors of historical transitions than colonial and postcolonial, or modern and postmodern. Asphalt roads, homes, classrooms, fences, and windows organize movement, perceptions, and selves in relation to others. A Certain Age is a portal into questions about how the past informs the present and how historical accounts are inevitably partial and incomplete.
Wanderings of a Pilgrim in Search of the Picturesque Fanny Parkes Parlby 2001 This edition of Fanny Parkes' account of her travels in India provides valuable insight into middle-class British women's views on Indian life. It includes descriptions of the Zenana and Indian domestic life--subjects that are often omitted from male-authored travel texts.
Memorials of Old London Peter Hampson Ditchfield 1908
Goldfinger Ian Fleming 2017-07-11 “Keep away from MR. AURIC GOLDFINGER. He is a most powerful man. If he wished to crush you, he would only have to roll over in his sleep to do so.” OPERATION GRAND SLAM Secret agent James Bond had been warned not to tangle with Goldfinger. But the super-criminal’s latest obsession was too strong, too dangerous. He had to be stopped. Goldfinger was determined to take possession of half the supply of mined gold in the world—to rob Fort Knox! For this incredible venture he had enlisted the aid of the top criminals in the U.S., including a bevy of beautiful thieves from the Bronx. And he had conceived so foolproof a plan that it would take all of Bond’s unique talents to make it fail—as fail it must. JAMES BOND challenges GOLDFINGER, THE MOST EVIL GENIUS HE HAS EVER FACED. He’s a phenomenal criminal who likes his women dressed only in gold paint. He’s a magnificent fiend who carries his cash in gold bars. He’s a powerful villain who plans to pull the biggest and boldest crime in history—the robbery of all the gold in Fort Knox. “It’s all marvellously intricate and polished storytelling, all absurdly impossible, all superlative fun.”—Cleveland News. “We recommend Goldfinger for just what it is: sophisticated, tongue-in-cheek entertainment par excellence.”—Playboy Magazine. “If you like heroes heroic, a woman who proves, finally, that she’s all woman, and a villain who is a dirty dog, then Goldfinger is for you.”—Detroit Sunday Times.
The Illustrated Book of Housebuilding and Carpentry Graham Blackburn 2003-10 Covers foundations, framing, sheathing, siding, roofing, wiring, plumbing, heating, insulation, ventilation, doors, windows, walls, ceilings, floors, and stairs
Oceanic Art and European Museums Lucie Carreau 2018-12-03 This book (vol. 1 of 2) not only enlarges understanding of Oceanic art history and Oceanic collections in important ways, but also enables new reflections upon museums and ways of undertaking work in and around them.
How to Make Fantasy and Medieval Dioramas Will Kalif 2012-12-14 This books shows you how to make fantasy and medieval dioramas using many commonly available tools and materials. There are over 100 pictures and illustrations showing you how to make great dioramas in fantasy and medieval styles. Chapters include basics, water effects, terrain tips and special effects like electricity and small motors. Tutorials include how to use foam, plaster of paris and paper mache to make great looking dioramas.
The Five Continents of Theatre Eugenio Barba 2019-02-11 The Five Continents of Theatre undertakes the exploration of the material culture of the actor, which involves the actors’ pragmatic relations and technical functionality, their behaviour, the norms and conventions that interact with those of the audience and the society in which actors and spectators equally take part.
Australian Earth-Covered Building S. Baggs 1991
Sacred Places Europe Brad Olsen 2007-02-01 Combining current trends, academic theories, and historical insights, this travel guide brings both lesser-known and famous European spiritual locales into perspective by explaining the significance of each sacred site. The cultural relevance, history, and spirituality of each site—including Stonehenge, the Acropolis, Mont Saint Michel, Pompeii, and Saint Peter's Basilica—are explained, creating a moving and artistic travel experience. Each destination—with selections spanning more than 15 countries throughout Europe—is accompanied by easy-to-follow maps and directions.
The Lands of the Saracen Bayard Taylor 1855
Phrases and Names, Their Origins and Meanings Trench H. Johnson 2019-11-22 "Phrases and Names, Their Origins and Meanings" by Trench H. Johnson. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.
The Century World's Fair Book for Boys and Girls Tudor Jenks 1893 A humorous fictional account of a visit to the World's Columbian exposition illustrated with actual photographs and sketches of the buildings, exhibits, and fairgrounds.
The Bonesetter's Daughter Amy Tan 2001-02-19 A mother and daughter find what they share in their bones in this compelling novel from the bestselling author of The Joy Luck Club and Where the Past Begins: A Writer’s Memoir. Ruth Young and her widowed mother have always had a difficult relationship. But when she discovers writings that vividly describe her mother’s tumultuous life growing up in China, Ruth discovers a side of LuLing that she never knew existed. Transported to a backwoods village known as Immortal Heart, Ruth learns of secrets passed along by a mute nursemaid, Precious Auntie; of a cave where dragon bones are mined; of the crumbling ravine known as the End of the World; and of the curse that LuLing believes she released through betrayal. Within the calligraphied pages awaits the truth about a mother's heart, secrets she cannot tell her daughter, yet hopes she will never forget... Conjuring the pain of broken dreams and the power of myths, The Bonesetter’s Daughter is an excavation of the human spirit: the past, its deepest wounds, its most profound hopes.
Theatre/Archaeology Mike Pearson 2005-07-08 Theatre/Archaeology is a provocative challenge to disciplinary practice and intellectual boundaries. It brings together radical proposals in both archaeological and performance theory to generate a startlingly original and intriguing methodological framework.
The House Stephen Gardiner 2002 The new edition of Stephen Gardiner's highly readable history of the house comes at a time of crisis in domestic architecture. The author clearly shows how the collapse of traditional values since the Second World War has been mirrored by the new architectural emphasis on materialism, bringing a disregard for the lessons of the past, and a loss of contact, both with human requirements and with nature as a source of inspiration. He offers an enlightening overview of the development of house and home, since the caves of early man, and the rich profusion of indigenous styles that has since emerged, from huts of mud and reeds, Ziggurats, Chinese underground villages with sunken courtyards, multistoreyed tenements in Ancient Rome, Japanese designs that blend with nature, through the Palladian, Arts and Crafts and, more recently, the rediscovery of a more human scale, and the importance of the frame, in particular in the designs of Le Corbusier and Frank Lloyd Wright. After the later twentieth century's violent swings from tower blocks to Post-Modernism and neo-traditionalism we face a new danger, the creeping sprawl that is swallowing up much of our beautiful countryside. Recognising th
The Evolution of Bruno Littlemore Benjamin Hale 2011-02-02 Bruno Littlemore is quite unlike any chimpanzee in the world. Precocious, self-conscious and preternaturally gifted, young Bruno, born and raised in a habitat at the local zoo, falls under the care of a university primatologist named Lydia Littlemore. Learning of Bruno's ability to speak, Lydia takes Bruno into her home to oversee his education and nurture his passion for painting. But for all of his gifts, the chimpanzee has a rough time caging his more primal urges. His untimely outbursts ultimately cost Lydia her job, and send the unlikely pair on the road in what proves to be one of the most unforgettable journeys -- and most affecting love stories -- in recent literature. Like its protagonist, this novel is big, loud, abrasive, witty, perverse, earnest and amazingly accomplished. The Evolution of Bruno Littlemore goes beyond satire by showing us not what it means, but what it feels like be human -- to love and lose, learn, aspire, grasp, and, in the end, to fail.
Transcendence Gaia Vince 2020-01-21 In the tradition of Guns, Germs, and Steel and Sapiens, a winner of the Royal Society Prize for Science Books shows how four tools enabled has us humans to control the destiny of our species "A wondrous, visionary work"--Tim Flannery, scientist and author of the bestselling The Weather Makers What enabled us to go from simple stone tools to smartphones? How did bands of hunter-gatherers evolve into multinational empires? Readers of Sapiens will say a cognitive revolution -- a dramatic evolutionary change that altered our brains, turning primitive humans into modern ones -- caused a cultural explosion. In Transcendence, Gaia Vince argues instead that modern humans are the product of a nuanced coevolution of our genes, environment, and culture that goes back into deep time. She explains how, through four key elements -- fire, language, beauty, and time -- our species diverged from the evolutionary path of all other animals, unleashing a compounding process that launched us into the Space Age and beyond. Provocative and poetic, Transcendence shows how a primate took dominion over nature and turned itself into something marvelous.
The Confessions of a Caricaturist Harris Furniss 2020-07-30 Reproduction of the original: The Confessions of a Caricaturist by Harris Furniss
European Buildings Florian Richter 2018-08 This is the perfect add-on supplement not just for Helion's famous 'Paper Boys' book series but for other wargames periods and systems too. In this book you will find all the building you need for a 18th and 19th rural or city landscaped terrain. Here will be some 22 pages of artwork intended to be cut straight out of the book pages. Subjects to include village buildings, a church, farmhouse, windmill etc. The models are scaled to 28mm, but through deft use of a photocopier can be rescaled for other popular sizes of figures.
The Tender Bar J. R. Moehringer 2005-09-01 Soon to be a major Amazon film directed by George Clooney and starring Ben Affleck, Tye Sheridan, Lily Rabe, and Christopher Lloyd, a raucous, poignant, luminously written memoir about a boy striving to become a man, and his romance with a bar, in the tradition of This Boy’s Life and The Liar’s Club. J.R. Moehringer grew up captivated by a voice. It was the voice of his father, a New York City disc jockey who vanished before J.R. spoke his first word. Sitting on the stoop, pressing an ear to the radio, J.R. would strain to hear in that plummy baritone the secrets of masculinity and identity. Though J.R.'s mother was his world, his rock, he craved something more, something faintly and hauntingly audible only in The Voice. At eight years old, suddenly unable to find The Voice on the radio, J.R. turned in desperation to the bar on the corner, where he found a rousing chorus of new voices. The alphas along the bar—including J.R.'s Uncle Charlie, a Humphrey Bogart look-alike; Colt, a Yogi Bear sound-alike; and Joey D, a softhearted brawler—took J.R. to the beach, to ballgames, and ultimately into their circle. They taught J.R., tended him, and provided a kind of fathering-by-committee. Torn between the stirring example of his mother and the lurid romance of the bar, J.R. tried to forge a self somewhere in the center. But when it was time for J.R. to leave home, the bar became an increasingly seductive sanctuary, a place to return and regroup during his picaresque journeys. Time and again the bar offered shelter from failure, rejection, heartbreak—and eventually from reality. In the grand tradition of landmark memoirs, The Tender Bar is suspenseful, wrenching, and achingly funny. A classic American story of self-invention and escape, of the fierce love between a single mother and an only son, it's also a moving portrait of one boy's struggle to become a man, and an unforgettable depiction of how men remain, at heart, lost boys. Named a best book of the year by The New York Times, Esquire, The Los Angeles Times Book Review, Entertainment Weekly, USA Today, NPR's "Fresh Air," and New York Magazine A New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Wall Street Journal, San Francisco Chronicle, USA Today, Booksense, and Library Journal Bestseller Booksense Pick Borders New Voices Finalist Winner of the Books for a Better Life First Book Award
Out of the Girls' Room and Into the Night Thisbe Nissen 1999 A collection of stories by the winner of the 1999 John Simmons Short Fiction Award delves deeply into love as it is experience by the under-thirty generation--among Deadheads, gay teenage girls, depressed Peace Corps volunteers, and anorexic dancers. Original.
Architects of Buddhist Leisure Justin Thomas McDaniel 2018-04-30 Buddhism, often described as an austere religion that condemns desire, promotes denial, and idealizes the contemplative life, actually has a thriving leisure culture in Asia. Creative religious improvisations designed by Buddhists have been produced both within and outside of monasteries across the region—in Nepal, Japan, Korea, Macau, Hong Kong, Singapore, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam. Justin McDaniel looks at the growth of Asia’s culture of Buddhist leisure—what he calls “socially disengaged Buddhism”—through a study of architects responsible for monuments, museums, amusement parks, and other sites. In conversation with noted theorists of material and visual culture and anthropologists of art, McDaniel argues that such sites highlight the importance of public, leisure, and spectacle culture from a Buddhist perspective and illustrate how “secular” and “religious,” “public” and “private,” are in many ways false binaries. Moreover, places like Lek Wiriyaphan’s Sanctuary of Truth in Thailand, Suối Tiên Amusement Park in Saigon, and Shi Fa Zhao’s multilevel museum/ritual space/tea house in Singapore reflect a growing Buddhist ecumenism built through repetitive affective encounters instead of didactic sermons and sectarian developments. They present different Buddhist traditions, images, and aesthetic expressions as united but not uniform, collected but not concise: Together they form a gathering, not a movement. Despite the ingenuity of lay and ordained visionaries like Wiriyaphan and Zhao and their colleagues Kenzo Tange, Chan-soo Park, Tadao Ando, and others discussed in this book, creators of Buddhist leisure sites often face problems along the way. Parks and museums are complex adaptive systems that are changed and influenced by budgets, available materials, local and global economic conditions, and visitors. Architects must often compromise and settle at local optima, and no matter what they intend, their buildings will develop lives of their own. Provocative and theoretically innovative, Architects of Buddhist Leisure asks readers to question the very category of “religious” architecture. It challenges current methodological approaches in religious studies and speaks to a broad audience interested in modern art, architecture, religion, anthropology, and material culture.
Blood Meridian Cormac McCarthy 2010-08-11 25th ANNIVERSARY EDITION • An epic novel of the violence and depravity that attended America's westward expansion, Blood Meridian brilliantly subverts the conventions of the Western novel and the mythology of the Wild West—from the bestselling, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of The Road Based on historical events that took place on the Texas-Mexico border in the 1850s, it traces the fortunes of the Kid, a fourteen-year-old Tennesseean who stumbles into the nightmarish world where Indians are being murdered and the market for their scalps is thriving.
Home Life in Colonial Days Alice Morse Earle 1898 Written in 1898, Home Life is a comprehensive account of the daily life & customs of the people of pre-Revolutionary America. Travel, meals, modes of dress, flower gardening, industry, social customs, & much more are described.
An Etymological Dictionary of the English Language on a Plan Entirely New John Oswald 1844
Middle Land, Middle Way Shravasti Dhammika 2008-12-01 A comprehensive guidebook to the places in India made sacred by the Buddha’s presence. Beginning with an inspiring account of Buddhist pilgrimage, the author then covers sixteen places in detail. With maps and colour photos, an essential companion for pilgrim and traveler.
Machu Picchu Richard L. Burger 2004-01-01 Details the status of contemporary research on Incan civilization, and addresses mysteries of the founding and abandonment of Machu Picchu, charting its archaeological history from 1911 to the present.
Sun Circles and Human Hands Emma Lila Fundaburk 2001-02-22 From utilitarian arrowheads to beautiful stone effigy pipes to ornately-carved shell disks, the photographs and drawings in Sun Circles and Human Hands present the archaeological record of the art and native crafts of the prehistoric southeastern Indians, painstakingly compiled in the 1950s by two sisters who traveled the eastern United States interviewing archaeologists and collectors and visiting the major repositories. Although research over the last 50 years has disproven many of the early theories reported in the text—which were not the editors' theories but those of the archaeologists of the day—the excellent illustrations of objects no longer available for examination have more than validated the lasting worth of this popular book.
A World of Many Worlds Marisol de la Cadena 2018-11-23 A World of Many Worlds is a search into the possibilities that may emerge from conversations between indigenous collectives and the study of science's philosophical production. The contributors explore how divergent knowledges and practices make worlds. They work with difference and sameness, recursion, divergence, political ontology, cosmopolitics, and relations, using them as concepts, methods, and analytics to open up possibilities for a pluriverse: a cosmos composed through divergent political practices that do not need to become the same. Contributors. Mario Blaser, Alberto Corsín Jiménez, Déborah Danowski, Marisol de la Cadena, John Law, Marianne Lien, Isabelle Stengers, Marilyn Strathern, Helen Verran, Eduardo Viveiros de Castro

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