Zibuyu, “What The Master Would Not Discuss”, according to Yuan Mei (1716 - 1798): A Collection of Supernatural Stories (2 vols) Paolo Santangelo 2013-07-09 Although the preface says that the tales in this collection of supernatural stories should not be taken seriously and just aim to dispel boredom, Zibuyu is a work with different reading levels, which allows to uncover several deep trends, taboos and fantasies of late imperial intellectual circles. Disgust, surprise and laughter are constantly evoked, by continually attracting and repulsing the reader. Santangelo and Yan have introduced, translated and commented upon the collection.
Wolf Totem and the Post-Mao Utopian Xiaojiang Li 2018-03-22 Applied to topics in the novel Wolf Totem by the political economist Jiang Rong, Western scholarship in the humanities and social sciences has insights and shortcomings to address an allegory of utopia in the novel and its significance for contemporary China.
Lugbara-English and English-Lugbara dictionary 2009
Consumer-Citizens of China Kelly Tian 2010-11-01 A PDF version of this book is available for free in open access via www.tandfebooks.com as well as the OAPEN Library platform, www.oapen.org. It has been made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives 3.0 license and is part of the OAPEN-UK research project. This book presents a comprehensive examination of Chinese consumer behaviour and challenges the previously dichotomous interpretation of the consumption of Western and non-Western brands in China. The dominant position is that Chinese consumers are driven by a desire to imitate the lifestyles of Westerners and thereby advance their social standing locally. The alternative is that consumers reject Western brands as a symbolic gesture of loyalty to their nation-state. Drawing from survey responses and in depth interviews with Chinese consumers in both rural and urban areas, Kelly Tian and Lily Dong find that consumers situate Western brands within select historical moments. This embellishment attaches historical meanings to Western brands in ways that render them useful in asserting preferred visions of the future China. By highlighting how Western brands are used in contests for national identity, Consumer-Citizens of China challenges the notion of the "patriot’s paradox" and answers scholars’ questions as to whether Chinese nationalists today allow for a Sino-Western space where the Chinese can love China without hating the West. Consumer-Citizens of China will be of interest to students and scholars of business studies, Chinese and Asian Studies and Political Science. Kelly Tian is Professor of Marketing and holds the Anderson Chair of Business at New Mexico State University. Lily Dong is Associate Professor of Marketing at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks.
Reordering Chinese Priorities on the Korean Peninsula Bonnie S. Glaser 2012-11-01
Classic of History (Part 1 & 2: The Book of Thang & The Books of Yü) Confucius 2013-09-05 This carefully crafted ebook: "Classic of History (Part 1 & 2: The Book of Thang & The Books of Yü)" is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. Originally called Shu (Book), The Classic of History got the name in the Han Dynasty, meaning a book of previous generations. It is China's earliest compilation of documentary records related to events in ancient history of China. Since the Han Dynasty, The Classic of History has been regarded as a classic on feudal Chinese politics and philosophy. It served as both a textbook for the emperors and an authoritative and classic code that children from noble families and scholar-bureaucrats must follow. The Classic of History had a great impact in Chinese history. Confucius (551–479 BC) was a Chinese teacher, editor, politician, and philosopher of the Spring and Autumn period of Chinese history.
Euro-Par 2020: Parallel Processing Maciej Malawski 2020-08-18 This book constitutes the proceedings of the 26th International Conference on Parallel and Distributed Computing, Euro-Par 2020, held in Warsaw, Poland, in August 2020. The conference was held virtually due to the coronavirus pandemic. The 39 full papers presented in this volume were carefully reviewed and selected from 158 submissions. They deal with parallel and distributed computing in general, focusing on support tools and environments; performance and power modeling, prediction and evaluation; scheduling and load balancing; high performance architectures and compilers; data management, analytics and machine learning; cluster, cloud and edge computing; theory and algorithms for parallel and distributed processing; parallel and distributed programming, interfaces, and languages; multicore and manycore parallelism; parallel numerical methods and applications; and accelerator computing.
Gadamer in Conversation Hans-Georg Gadamer 2001-01-01 This volume presents six lively conversations with Hans-Georg Gadamer (born 1900), one of the twentieth century's master philosophers. Looking back over his life and thought, Gadamer takes up key issues in his philosophy, addresses points of controversy, and replies to his critics, including those who accuse him of having been in complicity with the Nazis. A genial and direct conversationalist, Gadamer is here captured at his best and most accessible. The interviews took place between 1989 and 1996, and all but one appear in English for the first time in this volume. The first three conversations, conducted by Heidelberg philosopher Carsten Dutt, deal with hermeneutics, aesthetics, and practical philosophy and the question of ethics. In a fourth conversation, with University of Heidelberg classics professor Glenn W. Most, Gadamer argues for the vital importance of the Greeks for our contemporary thinking. In the next, the philosopher reaffirms his connection with phenomenology and clarifies his relation to Husserl and Heidegger in a conversation with London philosopher Alfons Grieder. In the final interview, with German Nazi expert Dorte von Westernhagen, Gadamer describes his life
Chinese Femininities, Chinese Masculinities Susan Brownell 2002 Chinese Literature: Lydia H. Liu
The Oxford American College Dictionary 2002 Provides more than 175,000 entries, boxed quotes demonstrating word usage and style, geographical country guides, and thumb-index tabs.
A Frequency Dictionary of Mandarin Chinese Richard Xiao 2015-06-18 A Frequency Dictionary of Mandarin Chinese is an invaluable tool for all learners of Mandarin Chinese, providing a list of the 5,000 words and the 2,000 Chinese characters (simplified) most commonly used in the language. Based on a fifty-million-word corpus composed of spoken, fiction, non-fiction and news texts in current use, the dictionary provides the user with a detailed frequency-based list, as well as alphabetical and part-of-speech indexes. All entries in the frequency list feature the English equivalent and a sample sentence with English translation. The Dictionary also contains thirty thematically organized lists of frequently used words on a variety of topics such as food, weather, travel and time expressions. A Frequency Dictionary of Mandarin Chinese enables students of all levels to maximize their study of Mandarin vocabulary in an efficient and engaging way. It is also an excellent resource for teachers of the language. A CD version is available to purchase separately. Designed for use by corpus and computational linguists it provides the full text in a format that researchers can process and turn into suitable lists for their own research work.
The Law of Outer Space Manfred Lachs 2010-09-10 Manfred Lachs’ famous treatise on the Law of Outer Space was originally published in 1972, yet it is still a classic and must-read text for space law students today. Issued on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the International Institute of Space Law, of which Lachs was President, this volume reproduces the original text of Lachs' work in full, with a new preface, introduction and index supplied by the editors.
Water Resource Technology Vikas Dubey 2021-08-23 Water resource systems and technologies are important fields in engineering today. This book will discuss various areas on water resource management. Topics discussed include water harvesting techniques, waste water purification, and urban water systems as well as concrete, pavement, and mortar stabilizers, and earthquake resistance technologies and how they relate to water management systems.
The Niche for Lights Abu Hamid Al-Ghazali 2010-04 Abu Hamid Mohammad ibn Mohammad Al-Ghazali (1058-1111), known as Algazel to the western medieval world, was born and died in Tus, in the Khorasan province of Persia (modern day Iran). He was a Muslim theologian, jurist, philosopher, psychologist and mystic of Persian origin and remains one of the most celebrated scholars in the history of Sufi Islamic thought. He is considered a pioneer of the methods of doubt and skepticism, and in one of his major works, The Incoherence of the Philosophers, he changed the course of early Islamic philosophy, shifting it away from the influence of ancient Greek and Hellenistic philosophy, and towards cause-and-effect that were determined by Allah. He received many titles such as Sharaful A'emma, Zainuddin and Hujjatul Islam, meaning "Proof of Islam." The autobiography Ghazali wrote towards the end of his life, The Confessions of Al-Ghazali: Rescuer from Error is considered a work of great importance. Another of Ghazali's major works is Ihya al-Ulum al-Din or Ihya'ul Ulumuddin (The Revival of Religious Sciences). It covers almost all fields of Islamic sciences: fiqh (Islamic jurisprudence), kalam (theology) and sufism.
On Their Own Terms Benjamin A. ELMAN 2009-06-30 Since the middle of the nineteenth century, imperial reformers, early Republicans, Guomindang party cadres, and Chinese Communists have all prioritized science and technology. In this book, Elman gives a nuanced account of the ways in which native Chinese science evolved over four centuries, under the influence of both Jesuit and Protestant missionaries. In the end, he argues, the Chinese produced modern science on their own terms.
Primary English Programme 1989
Precarious Creativity Michael Curtin 2016-02-17 Precarious Creativity examines the seismic changes confronting media workers in an age of globalization and corporate conglomeration. This pathbreaking anthology peeks behind the hype and supposed glamor of screen media industries to reveal the intensifying pressures and challenges workers face. The authors take on crucial issues and provide insightful case studies of workplace dynamics regarding creativity, collaboration, exploitation, and cultural difference. Furthermore, they investigate working conditions and organizing efforts on all six continents, offering comprehensive analysis of contemporary screen media labor in places such as Lagos, Prague, Hollywood, and Hyderabad, across a range of job categories that includes visual effects, production services, and adult entertainment. With contributions from John Caldwell, Vicki Mayer, Herman Gray, Tejaswini Ganti, and others, this collection offers timely critiques of media globalization and broader debates about labor, creativity, and precarity.
Atheism Revisited Szymon Wróbel 2020-01-14 Atheism Revisited is a collection of essays that explore the multifaceted nature of atheism. Starting from the notion that today’s atheism is shaped by the defining processes of Modernity—such as secularization and the breakup of science, philosophy, and theology—the first part of the book undertakes a thorough scrutiny of Modern atheisms, from Spinoza and Hobbes to Marx and Nietzsche. The second part of the book seeks to draw practical conclusions from this scrutiny and answer the questions: what is the state of atheism today? What is the role of an atheist in a world affected by religious fundamentalisms? What should the relationship between atheists and religious people look like? The wide scope of the book allows readers to see atheism as a central concern of many intellectual movements, from Marxism and French Theory to post-secularism and the reevaluation of Modernity, and to understand atheism as a focal point of the most important contemporary philosophical debates.
Essential Building Blocks of Human Nature Ulrich J. Frey 2010-11-08 To understand why we humans are as we are, it is necessary to look at the essential building blocks that comprise our nature. The foundations of this structure are our evolutionary origins as primates and our social roots. Upon these rest features such as our emotions, language and aesthetic preferences, with our self-perceptions, self-deceptions and thirst for knowledge right at the top. The unifying force holding these blocks together is evolutionary theory. Evolution provides a deeper understanding of human nature and, in particular, of the common roots of these different perspectives. To build a reliable and coherent model of man, leading authors from fields as diverse as primatology, anthropology, neurobiology and philosophy have joined forces to present essays each describing their own expert perspective. Together they provide a convincing and complete picture of our own human nature.
Effortless Action Edward Slingerland 2007-05-24 This book presents a systematic account of the role of the personal spiritual ideal of wu-wei--literally "no doing," but better rendered as "effortless action"--in early Chinese thought. Edward Slingerland's analysis shows that wu-wei represents the most general of a set of conceptual metaphors having to do with a state of effortless ease and unself-consciousness. This concept of effortlessness, he contends, serves as a common ideal for both Daoist and Confucian thinkers. He also argues that this concept contains within itself a conceptual tension that motivates the development of early Chinese thought: the so-called "paradox of wu-wei," or the question of how one can consciously "try not to try." Methodologically, this book represents a preliminary attempt to apply the contemporary theory of conceptual metaphor to the study of early Chinese thought. Although the focus is upon early China, both the subject matter and methodology have wider implications. The subject of wu-wei is relevant to anyone interested in later East Asian religious thought or in the so-called "virtue-ethics" tradition in the West. Moreover, the technique of conceptual metaphor analysis--along with the principle of "embodied realism" upon which it is based--provides an exciting new theoretical framework and methodological tool for the study of comparative thought, comparative religion, intellectual history, and even the humanities in general. Part of the purpose of this work is thus to help introduce scholars in the humanities and social sciences to this methodology, and provide an example of how it may be applied to a particular sub-field.
Trying Not to Try Edward Slingerland 2014-03-04 A deeply original exploration of the power of spontaneity—an ancient Chinese ideal that cognitive scientists are only now beginning to understand—and why it is so essential to our well-being Why is it always hard to fall asleep the night before an important meeting? Or be charming and relaxed on a first date? What is it about a politician who seems wooden or a comedian whose jokes fall flat or an athlete who chokes? In all of these cases, striving seems to backfire. In Trying Not To Try, Edward Slingerland explains why we find spontaneity so elusive, and shows how early Chinese thought points the way to happier, more authentic lives. We’ve long been told that the way to achieve our goals is through careful reasoning and conscious effort. But recent research suggests that many aspects of a satisfying life, like happiness and spontaneity, are best pursued indirectly. The early Chinese philosophers knew this, and they wrote extensively about an effortless way of being in the world, which they called wu-wei (ooo-way). They believed it was the source of all success in life, and they developed various strategies for getting it and hanging on to it. With clarity and wit, Slingerland introduces us to these thinkers and the marvelous characters in their texts, from the butcher whose blade glides effortlessly through an ox to the wood carver who sees his sculpture simply emerge from a solid block. Slingerland uncovers a direct line from wu-wei to the Force in Star Wars, explains why wu-wei is more powerful than flow, and tells us what it all means for getting a date. He also shows how new research reveals what’s happening in the brain when we’re in a state of wu-wei—why it makes us happy and effective and trustworthy, and how it might have even made civilization possible. Through stories of mythical creatures and drunken cart riders, jazz musicians and Japanese motorcycle gangs, Slingerland effortlessly blends Eastern thought and cutting-edge science to show us how we can live more fulfilling lives. Trying Not To Try is mind-expanding and deeply pleasurable, the perfect antidote to our striving modern culture.
Computing and Software Science Bernhard Steffen 2019-10-04 The papers of this volume focus on the foundational aspects of computer science, the thematic origin and stronghold of LNCS, under the title “Computing and Software Science: State of the Art and Perspectives”. They are organized in two parts: The first part, Computation and Complexity, presents a collection of expository papers on fashionable themes in algorithmics, optimization, and complexity. The second part, Methods, Languages and Tools for Future System Development, aims at sketching the methodological evolution that helps guaranteeing that future systems meet their increasingly critical requirements. Chapter 3 is available open access under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License via link.springer.com.
Celestial Delights Francis Reddy 2011-11-12 Celestial Delights is essentially a 'TV Guide' for teh sky. This will be its third edition. This title, which has aggregated sales of about 20,000 copies to date in its two previous editions and has found a niche with skygazers, is much awaited. Through extensive graphics integrated with an eight-year-long calendar of sky events, it provides a look at "don't miss" sky events, mostly for naked-eye and binocular observing. The book is organized by ease of observation - lunar phases and the brighter planets come first, while solar eclipses, the aurora, and comets come later. Celestial Delights also includes a hefty dose of sky lore, astronomical history, and clear overviews of current science. It provides a handy reference to upcoming naked-eye events, with information broken out in clear and simple diagrams and tables that are cross-referenced against a detailed almanac for each year covered. Most broad-ranging astronomy field guides focus on stars, constellations, and the deep sky, but tend to ignore planetary events, which are in by far the most widely observable aspects of the changing night sky. Celestial Delights puts a variety of information all in one place, presents it in a friendly way that does not require prior in-depth astronomical knowledge, but provides the context and historical background for understanding events that astronomical computer programs or web sites lack.
Run of the Red Queen Dan Breznitz 2011-01-01 Few observers are unimpressed by the economic ambition of China or by the nation's remarkable rate of growth. But what does the future hold? This meticulously researched book closely examines the strengths and weaknesses of the Chinese economic system to discover where the nation may be headed and what the Chinese experience reveals about emerging market economies. The authors find that contrary to popular belief, cutting edge innovation is not a prerequisite for sustained economic vitality--and that China is a perfect case in point.
Daoism in the Twentieth Century David A Palmer 2012-03 An interdisciplinary group of scholars explores the social history and anthropology of Daoism from the late nineteenth century to the present, focusing on the evolution of traditional forms of practice and community, as well as modern reforms and reinventions. Essays investigate ritual specialists, body cultivation and meditation traditions, monasticism, new religious movements, state-sponsored institutionalization, and transnational networks"--Publisher's Web site.
Afterlives of Chinese Communism Christian Sorace 2019-06-25 Afterlives of Chinese Communism comprises essays from over fifty world- renowned scholars in the China field, from various disciplines and continents. It provides an indispensable guide for understanding how the Mao era continues to shape Chinese politics today. Each chapter discusses a concept or practice from the Mao period, what it attempted to do, and what has become of it since. The authors respond to the legacy of Maoism from numerous perspectives to consider what lessons Chinese communism can offer today, and whether there is a future for the egalitarian politics that it once promised.
The Oxford Reverse Dictionary David Edmonds 2002 Have a word on the tip of your tongue? Unlike a thesaurus, where you look up alternatives to a word you know, or a dictionary, which defines a familiar word, this dictionary helps with words you are vaguely aware of, but can't bring to mind. Some 31,000 entries are listed under a wide range of subject areas and key words.
Galactic Pot-healer Philip K. Dick 1994 Joe Fernwright, a pot-healer or repairer of ceramics, not much in demand on Earth, attracts the interest of the Glimmung, an extraterrestrial being that may be divine
The Australian Official Journal of Trademarks 1906
Chinese Lexical Semantics Xinchun Su 2014-12-26 This book constitutes the proceedings of the 15 Chinese Lexical Semantics Workshop, CLSW 2014, held in Macau, China, in June 2014. The 41 regular and 3 short papers included in this volume were carefully reviewed and selected from 139 submissions. They are organized in topical sections named: lexical semantics; applications on natural language processing; and lexical resources and corpus linguistics.
50 Years of the Chinese Community in Singapore Cheng Lian Pang 2015-10-23 "Singapore's success story is essentially a "people" story. Singaporeans have good reason to celebrate the nation's golden jubilee with pride. In the short space of five decades the country has moved from Third World to First, and its real GDP has grown by 40 times! For this phenomenal progress, credit must go to its people, the Republic's primary resource. Against all odds and amidst dire predictions, Singaporeans proved that a united and resourceful community could build a nation from scratch. This book is dedicated to one segment of these Singaporeans--the Chinese community. In particular, this collection of essays focuses on the Chinese speaking members of the community whose many contributions are less familiar to those brought up on a strict diet of the English language"--
Invitation to World Religions Jeffrey Brodd 2021-07 "Featuring a unique, consistent, and modular chapter structure and numerous pedagogical features, Invitation to World Religions, Fourth Edition, invites students to explore the world's great religions with respect and a sense of wonder. The authors also encourage students to develop an appreciation for what religious beliefs and practices actually mean to their adherents"--
The Ilahita Arapesh Donald F. Tuzin 1976-01-01 "Examines the interrelated problems of the settlement size and societal scale in lowland New Guinea"--Dustjacket.
History and Culture of the Kirat People Īmāna Siṃha Cemjoṅga 2003 On history of Kiranti people in Nepal
CRISPR Explained - Joy and Horror Fred Dungan 2021-04-07 CRISPR is used and abused. Fictional examples provided. Moral and ethical issues are explored. Anyone can buy a starter CRISPR DNA editing kit on the internet for under $100. The thought of some clever Biology student editing virus RNA to produce a highly contagious designer disease that could escalate into a pandemic scares the bejesus out of me. In the right hands CRISPR can be a joy. In the wrong hands CRISPR can be a horror. We need to regulate its use.
PHYSICAL HYDROLOGY S. LAWRENCE DINGMAN. 2018
Semantic Relations and the Lexicon M. Lynne Murphy 2003-10-02 Semantic Relations and the Lexicon explores the many paradigmatic semantic relations between words, such as synonymy, antonymy and hyponymy, and their relevance to the mental organization of our vocabularies. Drawing on a century's research in linguistics, psychology, philosophy, anthropology and computer science, M. Lynne Murphy proposes a pragmatic approach to these relations. Whereas traditional approaches have claimed that paradigmatic relations are part of our lexical knowledge, Dr Murphy argues that they constitute metalinguistic knowledge, which can be derived through a single relational principle, and may also be stored as part of our extra-lexical, conceptual representations of a word. Part I shows how this approach can account for the properties of lexical relations in ways that traditional approaches cannot, and Part II examines particular relations in detail. This book will serve as an informative handbook for all linguists and cognitive scientists interested in the mental representation of vocabulary.
America's National Game Albert Goodwill Spalding 1911 This book is Albert Spaldings work of "historic facts concerning the beginning, evolution, development and popularity of base ball, with personal reminiscences of its vicissitudes, its victories and its votaries." It is one of the defining books in the early formative years of modern baseball.
Radio Free Albemuth Philip K. Dick 1985 Describes how the life of Nicholas Brady is disrupted by messages from a space satellite and how he shares the problem with his friend Phil Dick, the author, who plays a major role
Cultural Evolution Peter J. Richerson 2013-11-01 Leading scholars report on current research that demonstrates the central role of cultural evolution in explaining human behavior. Over the past few decades, a growing body of research has emerged from a variety of disciplines to highlight the importance of cultural evolution in understanding human behavior. Wider application of these insights, however, has been hampered by traditional disciplinary boundaries. To remedy this, in this volume leading researchers from theoretical biology, developmental and cognitive psychology, linguistics, anthropology, sociology, religious studies, history, and economics come together to explore the central role of cultural evolution in different aspects of human endeavor. The contributors take as their guiding principle the idea that cultural evolution can provide an important integrating function across the various disciplines of the human sciences, as organic evolution does for biology. The benefits of adopting a cultural evolutionary perspective are demonstrated by contributions on social systems, technology, language, and religion. Topics covered include enforcement of norms in human groups, the neuroscience of technology, language diversity, and prosociality and religion. The contributors evaluate current research on cultural evolution and consider its broader theoretical and practical implications, synthesizing past and ongoing work and sketching a roadmap for future cross-disciplinary efforts. Contributors Quentin D. Atkinson, Andrea Baronchelli, Robert Boyd, Briggs Buchanan, Joseph Bulbulia, Morten H. Christiansen, Emma Cohen, William Croft, Michael Cysouw, Dan Dediu, Nicholas Evans, Emma Flynn, Pieter François, Simon Garrod, Armin W. Geertz, Herbert Gintis, Russell D. Gray, Simon J. Greenhill, Daniel B. M. Haun, Joseph Henrich, Daniel J. Hruschka, Marco A. Janssen, Fiona M. Jordan, Anne Kandler, James A. Kitts, Kevin N. Laland, Laurent Lehmann, Stephen C. Levinson, Elena Lieven, Sarah Mathew, Robert N. McCauley, Alex Mesoudi, Ara Norenzayan, Harriet Over, Ju ̈rgen Renn, Victoria Reyes-García, Peter J. Richerson, Stephen Shennan, Edward G. Slingerland, Dietrich Stout, Claudio Tennie, Peter Turchin, Carel van Schaik, Matthijs Van Veelen, Harvey Whitehouse, Thomas Widlok, Polly Wiessner, David Sloan Wilson

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