P-51B/C Mustang Chris Bucholtz 2022-02-17 This new volume straps the reader into the cockpit of the P-51B/C as the Mustang-equipped fighter groups of the 'Mighty Eighth' Air Force attempt to defend massed heavy bomber formations from deadly Luftwaffe fighters charged with defending the Third Reich. Luftwaffe Reichsmarschall Hermann Göring admitted that the appearance of long-range Mustangs over Berlin spelled the end of the Jagdwaffe's ability to defeat American daylight bombing. But the Mustang was far more than an escort – it was a deadly hunter that could out-perform nearly every German fighter when it was introduced into combat. Entering combat in Europe in December 1943, P-51Bs and P-51Cs had advantages over German Bf 109s and Fw 190s in respect to the altitude they could reach, their rate of climb and top speed. Initially tapped for close bomber escort, Mustangs were quickly turned loose to range ahead of the bomber stream in order to challenge German fighters before they could assemble to engage the bombers en masse. Thanks to the Mustang's superior performance, USAAF pilots effectively blunted the Luftwaffe's tried and tested tactic for destroying B-17s and B-24s. Boldness and aggression in aerial combat meant that P-51B/C pilots inflicted a rapidly mounting toll on their German counterparts in the West during the early months of 1944, contributing mightily to Allied air superiority over northern France on D-Day. This volume, packed full of first-hand accounts, expertly recreates the combat conditions and flying realities for Mustang pilots (including headline aces such as Don Blakeslee and Don Gentile, as well as lesser known aviators). It is heavily illustrated with photographs, artwork and innovative and colourful 3D ribbon diagrams, which will provide a realistic overview of the most dynamic dogfights in aviation history.
Air Force Combat Units of World War II
56th Fighter Group Roger Freeman 2012-09-20 One of the first Thunderbolt groups to see action in the European Theatre of Operations (ETO) with the US Army Air Forces, the 56th Fighter Group (FG) was also the only fighter unit within the Eighth Air Force to remain equipped with the mighty P-47 until war's end. Led by the inspirational 'Hub' Zemke, this group was responsible for devising many of the bomber escort tactics employed by VIII Fighter Command between 1943 and 1945. By VE-Day the 56th FG had shot down 100 more enemy aircraft than any other group in the Eighth Air Force, its pilots being credited with 677 kills during 447 missions. The exploits of this elite fighter unit are detailed in this volume together with photographs, their aircraft profiles and insignia.
A Concise History of the U.S. Air Force Stephen L. McFarland 1997-10-20 Except in a few instances, since World War II no American soldier or sailor has been attacked by enemy air power. Conversely, no enemy soldier or sailor has acted in combat without being attached or at least threatened by American air power. Aviators have brought the air weapon to bear against enemies while denying them the same prerogative. This is the legacy of the U.S. Air Force, purchased at great cost in both human and material resources. More often than not, aerial pioneers had to fight technological ignorance, bureaucratic opposition, public apathy, and disagreement over purpose. Every step in the evolution of air power led into new and untrodden territory, driven by humanitarian impulses; by the search for higher, faster, and farther flight; or by the conviction that the air was the best way. Warriors have always coveted the high ground. If technology permitted them to reach it, men, women, and an air force held and exploited it – from Thomas Selfridge, first among so many who gave that “last full measure of devotion”; to “Women’s Airforce Service Pilot Ann Baumgartner, who broke social barriers to become the first American woman to pilot a jet; to Benjamin Davis, who broke racial barriers to become the first African American to command a flying group; to Chuck Yeager, a one-time non-commissioned flight officer who was the first to exceed the speed of sound; to John Levitow, who earned the Medal of Honor by throwing himself over a live flare to save his gunship crew; to John Warden, who began a revolution in air power thought and strategy that was put to spectacular use in the Gulf War. Industrialization has brought total war and air power has brought the means to overfly an enemy’s defenses and attack its sources of power directly. Americans have perceived air power from the start as a more efficient means of waging war and as a symbol of the nation’s commitment to technology to master challenges, minimize casualties, and defeat adversaries. This eight-two page book concludes that “future conflicts will bring new challenges for air power in the service of the nation.”
P-51 Mustang Robert Jackson 2020-09-30 An illustrated history of the renowned fighter aircraft, ideal for modelers and aviation enthusiasts: “Highly recommended.” —AMPS Indianapolis The North American P-51 Mustang was one of the most successful and effective fighter aircraft of all time. It was initially produced in response to a 1940 RAF requirement for a fast, heavily armed fighter able to operate effectively at altitudes in excess of 20,000 feet. North American built the prototype in 117 days, and the aircraft, designated NA-73X, flew on October 26, 1940. The first of 320 production Mustang Is for the RAF flew on May 1, 1941, powered by an 1,100hp Allison V-1710-39 engine. RAF test pilots soon found that with this powerplant the aircraft did not perform well at high altitude, but that its low-level performance was excellent. It was when the Mustang airframe was married to a Packard-built Rolls-Royce Merlin engine that the aircraft’s true excellence became apparent. Possessing a greater combat radius than any other Allied single-engine fighter, it became synonymous with the Allied victory in the air. During the last eighteen months of the war in Europe, escorting bomber formations, it hounded the Luftwaffe to destruction in the very heart of Germany. In the Pacific, operating from advance bases, it ranged over the Japanese Home Islands, joining carrier-borne fighters such as the Grumman Hellcat to bring the Allies massive air superiority. Yet the Mustang came about almost by accident, a product of the Royal Air Force’s urgent need for new combat aircraft in the dark days of 1940, when Britain, fighting for survival, turned to the United States for help in the island nation’s darkest hour. This is its story, including plentiful photos and information for modelers.
Ace in a Day Wayne K. Blickenstaff 2022-09-15 The war of "Ace in a Day" Wayne "Blick" Blickenstaff in his own words.
D-Day Nicholas A. Veronico 2019-06-01 Those who witnessed it never forgot it: the great armada of Allied ships that filled the English Channel on D-Day, June 6, 1944. From battleships, cruisers, and destroyers down to the much smaller landing ships and landing craft, these nearly 7,000 vessels bombarded the Normandy coast, ferried men, tanks, and equipment across the channel, and landed 150,000 troops—under withering German fire—on Omaha, Utah, Gold, Juno, and Sword beaches in a single day. In numbers and scope, it was the largest seaborne invasion in history. Meanwhile, some 12,000 aircraft flew above the sea, a dizzying assortment of fighters and bombers, transports, recon craft, and gliders. Taking off from air fields in England, they dropped thousands of paratroopers and even vehicles, bombed roads and German positions miles inland, provided vital intelligence, and attacked any German planes that were able to take to the skies. It was the largest single-day aerial operation in history. And yet these important—and impressive—aspects of D-Day haven’t received the coverage they deserve, having been overshadowed by the fighting on the beaches. Veronico assembles photos of both the air and sea components of the D-Day invasion, giving the sailors and airmen their due and giving modern readers a vivid sense of what this monumental day was like in the air and at sea.
Combat Squadrons of the Air Force; World War II. Maurer Maurer 1969 This collection of squadron histories has been prepared by the USAF Historical Division to complement the Division's book, Air Force Combat Units of World War II. The 1,226 units covered by this volume are the combat (tactical) squadrons that were active between 7 December 1941 and 2 September 1945. Each squadron is traced from its beginning through 5 March 1963, the fiftieth anniversary of the organization of the 1st Aero (later Bombardment) Squadron, the first Army unit to be equipped with aircraft for tactical operations. For each squadron there is a statement of the official lineage and data on the unit's assignments, stations, aircraft and missiles, operations, service streamers, campaign participation, decorations, and emblem.
US 9th Air Force Bases In Essex, 1943–44 Martin W. Bowman 2010-10-27 As part of the AHT series, the airfields and interest in this book are concentrated in a particular area in this case Essex. It covers the American air bases used by the Martin B-29 Marauders, P-47 Thunderbolts and P-51 Mustangs of the 9th USAAF Air Force during 1943-44 prior to their move south to France after the D-Day invasion on 6 June 1944.The airfields included are Andrews Field, Birch, Boreham, Boxted, Chipping Ongar, Earls Colne, Gosfield, Great Dunmow, Little Walden, Matching, Roydon, Rivenhall, Stansted, Wethersfield and Wormingford.This book looks at the history and personalities associated with each base, what remains today and explores the favourite local wartime haunts where aircrew and ground crew would have sought well-deserved entertainment and relaxation. Other museums and places that are relevant will also be described and general directions on how to get them included.
The Long Reach: Deep Fighter Escort Tactics Ray Merriam 2012-12-08 Merriam Press Military Reprint 21. First Reprint Edition (January 2013). In The Long Reach: Deep Fighter Escort Tactics by VIII Fighter Command, American fighter pilots of the Eighth Air Force provide their rules, in their own words, for conducting deep fighter escort operations accompanying American bomber formations over Europe. This extremely rare manual was published in May 1944, when deep fighter escort had become a major factor in the skies over Europe. The interior pages are facsimile copies of the original's pages. 59 photos.
North American Aviation P-51 Mustang Robert Jackson 2020-09-30 The North American P-51 Mustang was one of the most successful and effective fighter aircraft of all time. It was initially produced in response to a 1940 RAF requirement for a fast, heavily-armed fighter able to operate effectively at altitudes in excess of 20,000ft. North America built the prototype in 117 days, and the aircraft, designated NA-73X, flew on 26 October 1940. The first of 320 production Mustang Is for the RAF flew on 1 May 1941, powered by a 1,100hp Allison V-1710-39 engine. RAF test pilots soon found that with this powerplant the aircraft did not perform well at high altitude, but that its low-level performance was excellent. It was when the Mustang airframe was married to a Packard-built Rolls-Royce Merlin engine that the aircraft’s true excellence became apparent. Possessing a greater combat radius than any other Allied single-engine fighter, it became synonymous with the Allied victory in the air. During the last eighteen months of the war in Europe, escorting bomber formations, it hounded the Luftwaffe to destruction in the very heart of Germany. In the Pacific, operating from advance bases, it ranged over the Japanese Home Islands, joining carrier-borne fighters such as the Grumman Hellcat to bring the Allies massive air superiority. Yet the Mustang came about almost by accident, a product of the Royal Air Force’s urgent need for new combat aircraft in the dark days of 1940, when Britain, fighting for survival, turned to the United States for help in the island nation’s darkest hour.
The Western European and Mediterranean Theaters in World War II Donal Sexton 2011-10-06 The Western European and Mediterranean Theaters in World War II is a concise, comprehensive guide for students, teachers, and history buffs of the Second World War. With an emphasis on the American forces in these theaters, each entry is accompanied by a brief annotation that will allow researchers to navigate through the vast amount of literature on the campaigns fought in these regions with ease. Focusing on all aspects surrounding the U.S. involvement in the Western European and Mediterranean theaters, including politics, religion, biography, strategy, intelligence, and operations, this bibliography will be a welcome addition to the collection of any academic or research library. Routledge Research Guides to American Military Studies provide concise, annotated bibliographies to the major areas and events in American military history. With the inclusion of brief critical annotations after each entry, the student and researcher can easily assess the utility of each bibliographic source and evaluate the abundance of resources available with ease and efficiency. Comprehensive, concise, and current—Routledge Research Guides to American Military Studies are an essential research tool for any historian.
354th Fighter Group William N Hess 2012-12-20 I think the success of the 354th as the leading group in the European theatre for aerial victories is due to several things. First was the initial training of the squadrons before deployment to England. Colonel Ken Martin nurtured the group from its infancy, and all the excellence that later showed through could be placed at his doorstep. Despite his youth, he knew how to foster teamwork and demand perfection in flying. There was nothing more important than getting the group off on the right foot. Second, our pilots were taught to fly mutual support, and practised it faithfully. There were no "hot" pilots in the 354th, only "excellent" pilots. Third, men like Glenn Eagleston gave advice and warnings about combat tactics and guarding one's tail. This prepared our pilots for lurking dangers, something the other groups may not have done.' Brigadier General James Howard, Commanding Officer of the 354th Fighter Group
US 8th Army Air Force Fighter Command USAAF, 1943-45 Martin W. Bowman 2009-01-01 This book covers the bases used during the Second World War by the American fighter units that flew in support of the 8th Air Force's heavy bomber forces. The long-range Lightnings, Thunderbolts and Mustangs escorted the Mighty Eighth's Flying Fortresses and Liberators on their deep penetration raids into occupied Europe and Germany. Fighter cover was vital, since the USAAF flew daylight raids and in the early months the number of US aircraft lost to the defending Luftwuffe fighters was unacceptably high. The airfields included are Bodney, Bottisham, Boxted, Debden, Duxford, East Wretham, Fowlmere, Halesworth, Honington, Horsham St. Faith, King's Cliffe, Leiston, Martlesham Heath, Raydon, Steeple Morden, Wattisham and Wormingford. This book looks at the history and personalities associated with each base, what remains today and explores the favorite local wartime haunts where aircrew and ground crew would have sought well-deserved entertainment and relaxation. Other museums and places that are relevant will also be described and general directions on how to get them included.
In Search of Steam, 1953-1954 2007 This informative guide describes colors and markings for U.S. Army Air Force fighters in the European and Mediterranean theaters of WWII. With more than 300 illustrations and 140 photographs, the book makes an excellent reference for modelers and aviation buffs alike.
Milestones of Flight Robert Van Der Linden 2016-05-15 Experience the history of flight with the world-class aviation collection at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum, which attracts millions and millions of visitors each year in Washington, D.C. From the moment the Wright Brothers first took flight in 1903 to the modern-day reliance on stealth aircraft and drones, there have been significant advances made in aviation. Milestones of Flight celebrates each era of advancements by showcasing the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum's world-class aircraft collection. Authored by Dr. Robert van der Linden, a leading expert on aviation and Chairman of the Aeronautics Department at the NASM, this book is a stunning profile of the advancements in flight from decade to decade, illustrated with beautiful, large-scale photography and enhanced with little-known facts, anecdotes, and insights from major players in the aviation industry. Climb inside the cockpit of the Spirit of St. Louis that Charles Lindbergh piloted solo across the Atlantic Ocean, making history. Contrast that with a Boeing B-29 Superfortress, the first aircraft to drop an atomic bomb. The full-page photos of each milestone-making aircraft are accompanied by timelines to showcase related aircraft as well as sidebars with interesting and little-known facts, stories, and related research. Milestone categories include: - Era of Early Flight - World War I First Fighters - Long-Range Record-Setting Flight - Popular Flight - First Commercial Airliners - World War II Aircraft - Experimental Flight - Cold War Military/Korean Conflict Aircraft - Commercial Jets - Modern Military Aircraft What will the next milestone be?
‘Down to Earth' Strafing Aces of the Eighth Air Force William N Hess 2012-12-20 Like The Long Reach, Down to Earth is a message from the battle at its height, told in their own words by the men who fight' this is how Brig-Gen Francis Griswold, VIII Fighter Command, ends his introduction to this book. His official endorsement reveals just how important a document Down to Earth was to the teaching of tyro fighter pilots heading for action in the ETO. More leading aces were lost to flak whilst ground strafing than to German fighters. In this book William Hess has included biographies of all the pilots that originally contributed to this work back in 1943-44.
Aircraft of the 8th AAF 1942-1945 Kev Darling
Millville Army Air Field John J. Galluzzo 2011 Millville had always been known for its glassmaking, but with the outbreak of World War II, the community's identity was primed to change forever. A private civilian airfield gave way to the creation of America's first defense airport, the training ground for the U.S. Army's Curtiss P-40 Warhawk and Republic P-47 Thunderbolt pilots. Bright and brave young men from across the country converged on Millville in the early 1940s to learn to fly and fight for freedom. Some died in training; others flew into history as heroes. While in Millville, they lived the average lives of the country's military men, playing baseball, flirting with the girls at the local USO dances, and attending Sunday night dinners with local families, creating lifelong friendships in a time when a young man's life expectancy was in the hands of America's enemies.
American Aviation Historical Society Journal American Aviation Historical Society 1996
Flypast 2008
P-51 Mustang Cory Graff 2015-10-19 From D-Day to the Battle of the Bulge, through reconnaissance missions and combat, fighting flying bombs and Me 262 Stormbird jets, P-51 Mustang pilots saw it all during World War II. P-51 Mustang celebrates the 75th anniversary of the most iconic American warbird written by Cory Graff, lead curator at the Flying Heritage Collection--one of the world's most important collections and sites for warbird restoration. The entire story of this plane is here, starting with the astonishing fact that the P-51 Mustang was built in less than 120 days. This first version was hardly a world-beater, and it took the addition of a Rolls-Royce-designed Merlin to make the Mustang a legend. These nimble and versatile fighters were able to escort Allied heavy bombers all the way to Berlin and back. In the Pacific, their long-range ability was pushed to its limit, with pilots flying 1,500-mile, eight-or-more-hour missions over water to attack Tokyo. On the home front, Graff profiles the impact manufacturing Mustangs had on workers in Los Angeles and Dallas. The United States wasn't finished with the P-51 Mustang after World War II. It was used in the Korean War and, afterwards, as a symbol and icon of American ingenuity.
Flying Warbirds Cory Graff 2014-11-03 Get a comprehensive look at how World War II was fought from the air. Do you want to get an up-close look at some of the rarest airplanes in the world? Are you curious about combat aircraft from World War II? In deluxe hard-back volumes, Flying Warbirds brings U.S., British, German, Russian and Japanese fighting planes from the 1930s and 1940s together, complete with detailed photographs to delight every aeronautics connoisseur. The airplanes at the Flying Heritage Collection were created at a time when aeronautical discovery had evolved to aviation mastery. Finely crafted by distinguished design bureaus with the leading technologies of the 1930s and 1940s, the main emphasis of the collection includes combat aircraft from World War II. In 1998, Paul G. Allen began acquiring and preserving these iconic warriors and workhorses, many of which are the last of their kind. Allen's passion for aviation and history, and his awareness of the increasing rarity of original WWII aircraft, motivated him to restore these artifacts to the highest standard of authenticity. Periodically, one or more of the exhibits are temporarily absent to participate in an event, for maintenance, or for continuing restoration. Experience one of the world’s top airplane collections any time you like through Flying Warbirds. Photographs include cockpit shots, exterior museum shots, historic photographs, and breathtaking contemporary flying shots from photographers like award-winning John Dibbs. Flying Warbirds is the definitive guide to everything you want to know about this fascinating period in aeronautics and military history.
The Encyclopedia of Weapons of World War II Chris Bishop 2002 The encyclopedia of weapns of world war II is the most detailed and authoritative compendium of the weapons of mankind's greatesst conflict ever published. It is a must for the military, enthusiast, and all those interested in World War II.
359th Fighter Group Jack H Smith 2012-10-20 Nicknamed the 'Unicorns', the 359th FG was one of the last groups to arrive in the UK for service in the ETO with the Eighth Air Force. First seeing action on 13 December 1943, the group initially flew bomber escort sweeps in P-47s, before converting to the ubiquitous P-51 in March/April 1944. Throughout its time in the ETO, the 359th was credited with the destruction of 351 enemy aircraft destroyed between December 1943 and May 1945. The exploits of all 12 aces created by the group are detailed, along with the most significant missions flown. This book also discusses the various markings worn by the group's three squadrons, the 368th, 369th and 370th FSs
Down to Earth VIII Fighter Command 2020-11 In their own words, American fighter pilots of the Eighth Air Force provide their rules for conducting ground attack operations against the enemy. There was much more to ground attack than flying low and shooting up anything and everything, and these pilots tell how they did it in their own words. An extremely rare manual published in August 1944, just when ground attack was becoming a major factor in the war across the European continent. Originally published 30 August 1944 by VIII Fighter Command. Starts with "From the Zenith to the Deck" by Brigadier General Francis H. Griswold, USA, Commanding. Includes Pilots Rules for Ground Attack by these pilots: Colonel Donald J. M. Blakeslee, 4th Fighter Group, P-51; Colonel Thomas J. J. Christian Jr., 361st Fighter Group, P-51; Lt. Col. Ben Rimerman, 353rd Fighter Group, P-47; Lt. Col. William B. Bailey, 353rd Fighter Group, P-47; Capt. William J. Maguire, 353rd Fighter Group, P-47; Capt. Gordon B. Compton, 353rd Fighter Group, P-47; Capt. Vic L. Byers, 353rd Fighter Group, P-47; Capt. James N. Poindexter, 353rd Fighter Group, P-47; 1st Lt. Horace Q. Waggoner, 353rd Fighter Group, P-47; Major Charles J. Hoey, 353rd Fighter Group, P-47; Capt. Leslie P. Cles, 353rd Fighter Group, P-47; Capt. Wayne K. Blickenstaff, 353rd Fighter Group, P-47; Major Kenneth W. Gallup, 353rd Fighter Group, P-47; Col. Joe L. Mason, 352nd Fighter Group, P-51; Col. Roy W. Osborn, 364th Fighter Group, P-38; Col. Avelin P. Tacon Jr., 359th Fighter Group, P-51; 1st Lt. R. B. Hatter, 368th Fighter Squadron, 359th Fighter Group, P-51; 1st Lt. R. L. Thacker, 369th Fighter Squadron, 359th Fighter Group, P-51; Lt. Col. John B. Murphy, 370th Fighter Squadron, 359th Fighter Group, P-51; Col. John B. Henry Jr., 339th Fighter Group, P-51; Col. Hubert Zemke, 56th Fighter Group, P-47; Capt. B. M. Gladych, Polish Air Force, P-47; Lt. Col. Thomas L. Hayes Jr., 357th Fighter Group, P-51; Col. F. C. Gray, 78th Fighter Group, P-51. 76 photos, 1 drawing, 1 diagram. A Merriam Press World War II History Reprint.
P-47 Thunderbolt at War Cory Graff
Short Indiana Road Trips Paul R. Wonning Embark on a voyage of discovery with this travel guide that reveals some of Indiana’s finest treasures. From parks to museums and other gems from all over the state, let Short Indiana Road Trips be your guide. indiana, tourism, local, road trip, day trip
A Thousand Shall Fall Murray Peden 2003-04-01 During World War II, Canada trained tens of thousands of airmen under the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. Those selected for Bomber Command operations went on to rain devastation upon the Third Reich in the great air battles over Europe, but their losses were high. German fighters and anti-aircraft guns took a terrifying toll. The chances of surviving a tour of duty as a bomber crew were almost nil. Murray Peden’s story of his training in Canada and England, and his crew’s operations on Stirlings and Flying Fortresses with 214 Squadron, has been hailed as a classic of war literature. It is a fine blend of the excitement, humour, and tragedy of that eventful era.
AAHS Journal American Aviation Historical Society 1996
Storm of Eagles John Dibbs 2017-06-29 Soaring high above the fields and cities of Europe and Asia as well as the vast expanse of the Pacific, Allied and Axis pilots engaged in a deadly battle for control of the skies in World War II. Whoever won the skies would win the war. Published in association with the National Museum of World War II Aviation, Storm of Eagles is a fully illustrated coffee-table book that brings together classic as well as never-before-seen wartime images. Compiled by one of the world's premier aviation photographers and historians, this remarkable volume is a must-have for anyone interested in World War II aviation.
Fighter Bases of WW II US 8th Army Air Force Fighter Command USAAF, 1943–45 Martin W. Bowman 2009-08-19 This book covers the bases used during the Second World War by the American fighter units that flew in support of the 8th Air Forces heavy bomber forces.The long-range Lightnings, Thunderbolts and Mustangs escorted the Mighty Eighths Flying Fortresses and Liberators on their deep penetration raids into occupied Europe and Germany. Fighter cover was vital, since the USAAF flew daylight raids and in the early months the number of US aircraft lost to the defending Luftwuffe fighters was unacceptably high.The airfields included are Bodney, Bottisham, Boxted, Debden, Duxford, East Wretham, Fowlmere, Halesworth, Honington, Horsham St. Faith, Kings Cliffe, Leiston, Martlesham Heath, Raydon, Steeple Morden, Wattisham and Wormingford.This book looks at the history and personalities associated with each base, what remains today and explores the favorite local wartime haunts where aircrew and ground crew would have sought well-deserved entertainment and relaxation. Other museums and places that are relevant will also be described and general directions on how to get them included.
North American Mustang P-51 Dave Windle 2011-12-13 The Mustang was born from a British WW2 specification to North American during 1940. The prototype was completed within 117 days but the RAF was not happy with the aircraft's performance and suggested replacing the V-12 Allison with the more powerful RR Merlin. The result was a superbly fast and maneuverable aircraft that had the range to escort Allied bomber forces on raids deep into occupied Europe. A total of 15,469 of the type were built and used in combat until the Korean War.This book contains the world famous color profiles created by Dave Windle of the type in different operational modes, configurations and color schemes. Martin Bowman has written detailed descriptions and photographs to create the perfect enthusiasts' reference.
Slybirds Graham Cross 2017-03-19 The distinctive black and yellow chequered markings of the 353rd Fighter Group, the 'Slybirds', made them one of the USAAF 'Mighty' 8th Air Force's most colourful fighter groups. Flying P-47D Thunderbolts and later P-51D Mustangs the 353rd's appearance in the skies over occupied Europe witnessed growing American air power and helped to change the course of the air war. From mid-1943 until the end of hostilities in Europe, the 353rd participated in all major aerial battles from the 1943 Regensburg and Schweinfurt raids to 'Big Week', the attacks on Berlin, and the support of the D-Day landings and Normandy campaign in 1944. They went on to win the Distinguished Unit Citation during the Arnhem operation of September 1944 and after converting to P-51 Mustangs they continued to play a full and prominent role in the final smashing of the Third Reich from the air.Fighting High Publishing has come together with respected 8th Air Force historian Graham Cross to tell the story of the 'Slybirds'. With access to an unparalleled photographic archive built up over nearly thirty years of close association and friendship with the group, the author provides a detailed representation of all aspects of the group's key activities. Focussing not just on the aircraft and pilots but also the vital work of the ground crews and service personnel, this is a stunning tribute that fills a major gap in the history of 8th Fighter Command. A full honour roll to those who made the ultimate sacrifice is included along with details of all POWs and all confirmed claims by the Group's air-to-air aces.Packed with nearly 450 photos, the majority of which are previously unpublished, unseen wartime colour photos and detailed captions, this book is a visual and information feast. This latest volume in Fighting High Publishing's 'Odyssey' series is the most in-depth photographic record of the 353rd to date and provides a unique window on a fighter group at war.
Mustang P-51 William Miller 2020-03-08 6X9, 145 page Journal/Notebook. Many people consider the P-51 Mustang the best fighter of World War II. Its combination of speed, range, maneuverability, and firepower gave it great versatility. Its use in all major theaters of the war included long-range high-altitude escort, strafing, and photo reconnaissance. Originally developed by North American for the British, the Mustang was later ordered in large quantities by the U.S. Army Air Forces. This P-51 is displayed in the markings of the 351st Fighter Squadron, 353rd Fighter Group, Eighth Air Force. North American built more than 14,000 Mustangs and more D-models (8,302) than all other variants combined. The most significant D-model features were a rear fuselage reduced in height to accommodate a new bubble canopy and an increase in armament from 4 to 6 fifty-caliber machine guns. The Air Force did not withdraw P-51s from service until 1957. North American built the NASM P-51D-30-NA, Air Force serial number 44-74939, late in 1945. It was not delivered until July 1945 and never saw combat. The Army Air Forces first assigned the fighter to Andrews Field, outside Washington, D.C., and later to Freeman Field, Indiana. After eleven months and 211 flying hours of operational service, this Mustang was set aside as a museum specimen and later transferred to the National Air Museum. When NASM acquired this Mustang, it bore a proud admonition on both sides of the fuselage in large black letters: "Guard The Victory, Join the AAF." The airplane was probably used for recruiting drives toward the end of its military career. For exhibit purposes, this Mustang is painted in the colors and markings of the 351st Fighter Squadron, 353rd Fighter Group, 8th Air Force. This unit converted from North American P-47 Thunderbolts to Mustangs on September 30, 1944, while stationed at Raydon, Suffolk, England. The 353rd is typical of the many units assigned to escort bombers on missions deep into Germany. After air engagements to protect the bombers, the P-51s of the 353rd would attack enemy aircraft and ground installations on strafing missions on their way home. This fighter group claimed 330 1/2 aircraft shot down and 414 destroyed on the ground. It was awarded the Distinguished Unit Citation for the support of airborne landings in Holland.
North American P-51B/C Mustang in USAAF Service Richard Ward 1969 Beskriver det fra 2. verdenskrig kendte amerikanske jagerfly North American P-51 Mustang i dets forskellige versioner
Day Trips® from Cincinnati Sacha Bellman 2007-10-01 Within a two-hour drive of Cincinnati, discover the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium, and Kentucky's Red River Gorge Geological Area.
Mustang Designer Ray Wagner 2014-12-02 Mustang Designer tells the story of American wartime fighter development, including engines and armaments, as part of a nationwide program of aircraft builders and fliers, focusing on Edgar Schmued, the designer of the Mustang. The P-51 Mustang is widely regarded as the best propeller-driven fighter that ever flew. What many might not realize is that the plane's developer was a German migrant. This book tells of how Schmued created a weapon that would ultimately prove lethal to the aspirations of those who had seized control over his native land.
World War 2 In Review: Republic P-47 Thunderbolt Merriam Press 2017-04-26 Merriam Press World War 2 In Review Series. First eBook Edition 2017. Pictorial with concise history of the Republic P-47 Thunderbolt in USAAF and foreign service. The P-47 was one of the largest and heaviest fighter aircraft in history to be powered by a single piston engine. It was heavily armed with eight .50-caliber machine guns, four per wing. The Thunderbolt was one of the main United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) fighters of World War II, and served with other Allied air forces, notably those of France (Armee de l'air), Britain (RAF), and Russia (Soviet air force). Mexican and Brazilian squadrons fighting alongside the U.S. were also equipped with the P-47. 279 B&W/color photos/illustrations.
Fighter! Jim Laurier 2016-11 Plunge into the action, and marvel at ten of the best and best-known World War II fighter aircraft! There's no shortage of fantastic archival aviation photography from World War II. But photos from the period fall short in three major categories: the vast majority are black and white, most were composed under duress, and very few capture moments that have since entered the written record of aerial conflict. Award-winning artist Jim Laurier rectifies the situation in this stunning, large-format, hardcover book celebrating World War II's top fighter aircraft. From design and weaponry to the daring tales of the pilots who flew the aircraft, Fighter! is a unique and lavishly presented look at World War II aviation through the imagination of military aviation's top artist and illustrator. The book presents chapters about ten legendary aircraft, each featuring paintings of the fighter in action, multi-view color plates (including cockpits), archival photography for context, and the stories behind the planes' design and service. The featured aircraft are: the Messerschmitt Bf 109, Hawker Hurricane, Lockheed P-38 Lightning, Mitsubishi A6M Zero, Curtiss P-40, Focke-Wulf Fw 190, Supermarine Spitfire, North American P-51, Republic P-47, and Messerschmitt Me 262. While each of Laurier's paintings and illustrations are breathtaking and technically exacting, the stories highlight key moments in battle and the nostalgia surrounding these fighters and their pilots, offering anecdotes that enhance the art's power. A complete appendix includes key statistics for each aircraft. A warbird history like no other, Fighter! brings the romance of aerial combat, the power of agile takeoffs, and the fury of deadly weapons alive on the page.

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