The Making of Stanley Kubrick's 2001: a Space Odyssey Piers Bizony 2015 Part visual majesty, part meticulous science, part limitless imagination. Previously available as part of the multi-volume and instant sell-out Collector's Edition, this exhaustive compendium of photographs, pre-production paintings, and conceptual designs explores the genius behind 2001: A Space Odyssey, the sci-fi classic that remains the...
2001 Piers Bizony 2000 Filled with material that came to light after the publication of the firstdition in 1994, this updated edition includes interviews, new material fromffects supervisor Doug Turnbull and additional illustrations.
The Problem of Space Travel Hermann Noordung 1995-03-01 A translation from German of a 1929 treatise by the author. Deals with the problem of the space travel. Expresses ideas about rocketry and space travel. Extensive treatment of the engineering aspects of a space station. Extensive bibliography. 100 drawings.
Space Settlements Richard D. Johnson 1977
2001, a Space Odyssey Arthur Charles Clarke 1982 It has been forty years since the publication of this classic science fiction novel that changed the way we look at the stars and ourselves. From the savannas of Africa at the dawn of mankind to the rings of Saturn as man adventures to the outer rim of our solar system, 2001: A Space Odyssey is a journey unlike any other. This allegory about humanity's exploration of the universe, and the universe's reaction to humanity, was the basis for director Stanley Kubrick's immortal film, and lives on as a hallmark achievement in storytelling.
Dream Missions Michel van Pelt 2017-05-24 This book takes the reader on a journey through the history of extremely ambitious, large and complex space missions that never happened. What were the dreams and expectations of the visionaries behind these plans, and why were they not successful in bringing their projects to reality thus far? As spaceflight development progressed, new technologies and ideas led to pushing the boundaries of engineering and technology though still grounded in real scientific possibilities. Examples are space colonies, nuclear-propelled interplanetary spacecraft, space telescopes consisting of multiple satellites and canon launch systems. Each project described in this book says something about the dreams and expectations of their time, and their demise was often linked to an important change in the cultural, political and social state of the world. For each mission or spacecraft concept, the following will be covered: • Description of the design. • Overview of the history of the concept and the people involved. • Why it was never developed and flown • What if the mission was actually carried out – consequences, further developments, etc.
Orbital 2100 Paul Elliott 2016-09-25 Orbital 2100 is a science fiction setting for Cepheus Engine and other Classic 2D6 SF RPGs. It has realistic (TL 9) feel that is set within our own solar system. The Earth is locked in a Cold War with the people of Luna. Both face off, 400,000 km apart, threatening mutual annihilation whilst they compete to colonise the moons of Jupiter and Saturn. Older colonies such as Mars and Mercury are independent and caught up in this struggle for solar system supremacy. Spacecraft use nuclear thermal rockets and create gravity by spinning pods or centrifuges, this is spaceflight as envisaged today! In keeping with the near-future and hard-science fiction themes, role-playing campaigns focus on real people doing real jobs. The game has rules, technology and advice to allow scenarios based around deep space haulage, asteroid mining, salvage, rescue and exploration. Colour cover, with B&W interior. Claim a free copy of the full colour PDF by contacting Zozer: https: //www.paulelliottbooks.com/contact.html
Space Exploration Richard Brownell 2012-12-07 Humans have always wondered about the nature of the universe outside the tangible reaches of Earth. Not until the twentieth century could space be explored in earnest, as advances in rocket, computer, and optical technologies made crewed travel outside the atmosphere possible. Yet even after humans walked on the moon, space continues to hold many secrets that can enrich our understanding of the universe we live in. Author Richard Brownell offers a compelling account of space exploration as it has evolved and sharpened its focus. Chapters discuss the evolution of astronomy, early attempts at manned flight, the race between the Soviet Union and the United States to land on the moon, the advances in science yielding from space exploration that have changed life on Earth, and the future of space exploration as space programs contract and budgets tighten.
Stanley Kubrick Stanley Kubrick 2001 From his first feature film, Fear and Desire (1953), to his final, posthumously released Eyes Wide Shut (1999), Stanley Kubrick excelled at probing the dark corners of human consciousness. In doing so, he adapted such popular novels as The Killing, Lolita, A Clockwork Orange, and The Shining and selected a wide variety of genres for his films -- black comedy (Dr. Strangelove), science fiction (2001: A Space Odyssey), and war (Paths of Glory and Full Metal Jacket). Because he was peerless in unveiling the intimate mysteries of human nature, no new film by Kubrick ever failed to spark debate or to be deeply pondered. Kubrick (1928-1999) has remained as elusive as the subjects of his films. Unlike many other filmmakers he was not inclined to grant interviews, instead preferring to let his movies speak for themselves. By allowing both critics and moviegoers to see the inner workings of this reclusive filmmaker, this first comprehensive collection of his relatively few interviews is invaluable. Ranging from 1959 to 1987 and including Kubrick's conversations with Gene Siskel, Jeremy Bernstein, Gene D. Phillips, and others, this book reveals Kubrick's diverse interests -- nuclear energy and its consequences, space exploration, science fiction, literature, religion, psychoanalysis, the effects of violence, and even chess -- and discloses how each affects his films. He enthusiastically speaks of how advances in camera and sound technology made his films more effective. Kubrick details his hands-on approach to filmmaking as he discusses why he supervises nearly every aspect of production. "All the hand-held camerawork is mine," he says in a 1972 interview about A Clockwork Orange. "In addition to the fun of doing the shooting myself, I find it virtually impossible to explain what I want in a hand-held shot to even the most talented and sensitive camera operator. " Neither guarded nor evasive, the Kubrick who emerges from these interviews is candid, opinionated, confident, and articulate. His incredible memory and his gift for organization come to light as he quotes verbatim sections of reviews, books, and articles. Despite his reputation as a recluse, the Kubrick of these interviews is approachable, witty, full of anecdotes, and eager to share a fascinating story. Gene D. Phillips, S.J., is a professor of English at Loyola University in Chicago, where he teaches fiction and the history of film. He is the author of many notable books on film and is a founding member of the editorial board of both Literature/Film Quarterly and The Tennessee Williams Journal. He was acquainted with Stanley Kubrick for twenty-five years.
101 Thought-Provoking Films Bob Navarro 2019-06-08 Films are entertainment that create an escape from our ordinary reality. Many of these films are thought-provoking, especially when they address possibilities that may come true in the future.
The Science of Science Fiction Matthew Brenden Wood 2017-02-20 Early science fiction imagined a world with space travel, video calls, and worldwide access to information, things we now know as NASA’s human spaceflight program, Skype, and the Internet. What next? Could we really bring back the dinosaurs, travel to a distant star, or live on Mars? In The Science of Science Fiction, readers ages 12 to 15 explore the science behind classic and modern science fiction stories, including artificial intelligence, androids, and the search for alien life. They learn how cutting edge concepts, including time dilation and genetic manipulation, influence today’s fiction. The Science of Science Fiction promotes critical thinking skills through inquiry, discovery, research, analysis, and reflection of key scientific ideas and concepts made popular by many titles in science fiction. Each chapter features informative sidebars and video and website links for an in-depth look at key topics. Science-minded experiments include a simple demonstration of artificial gravity using a bucket of water and calculating the speed of light using chocolate in a microwave. This variety of resources ensures the material is accessible to students with diverse learning styles.
Outer Space in Society, Politics and Law Christian Brünner 2012-08-30 Spaceflight is a rational undertaking, yet full of emotions. It is a dream of mankind and a multi-billion industry likewise. It is subject to a distinct branch of law – and moreover part of modern pop culture. In short: spaceflight is fascinating. “Outer Space in society, politics and law” is an inter-disciplinary approach to the understanding of modern space law. Technical, cultural and historical aspects lay the foundation for a sound comprehension why space law norms have been established and what they mean in practice. The reader will realize the impact space and spaceflight have on society – from Stonehenge to climate change. A new approach to presenting space law: comprehensive and illustrative. “We live in a society absolutely dependent on science and technology and yet have cleverly arranged things so that almost no one understands science and technology. That's a clear prescription for disaster.” Carl Sagan
The Ethics of Space Exploration James S.J. Schwartz 2016-07-25 This book aims to contribute significantly to the understanding of issues of value (including the ultimate value of space-related activities) which repeatedly emerge in interdisciplinary discussions on space and society. Although a recurring feature of discussions about space in the humanities, the treatment of value questions has tended to be patchy, of uneven quality and even, on occasion, idiosyncratic rather than drawing upon a close familiarity with state-of-the-art ethical theory. One of the volume's aims is to promote a more robust and theoretically informed approach to the ethical dimension of discussions on space and society. While the contributions are written in a manner which is accessible across disciplines, the book still withstands scrutiny by those whose work is primarily on ethics. At the same time it allows academics across a range of disciplines an insight into current approaches toward how the work of ethics gets done. The issues of value raised could be used to inform debates about regulation, space law and protocols for microbial discovery as well as longer-range policy debates about funding.
British Film Design Laurie N. Ede 2010-03-30 "British Film Design" is about the things that you see when you close your eyes and think of British cinema: "Dr. No's Hideaway", the buffet of "Brief Encounter", Vera Drake's parlour, "Hogwarts School"...and a thousand other visions of British films. This book is also about the people who have created those visions. The physical environments of films are made by Production Designers/Art Directors. Their efforts have tended to go unnoticed by cinema audiences. "British Film Design" offers the first comprehensive historical survey of British art direction. It takes a chronological journey through British film design, starting with the efforts of the film 'primitives' of the silent era and ending with the modern day purveyors of part built/part computer generated 'blended design'. Certain themes recur en route. These include British cinema's obsession with realism; the Production Designer's continual struggle for recognition; influence from European artists and the benefits - and perils - of American finance. The book succeeds in expressing the joy of looking at films from inside out; seeing beyond the stars to recognise sets as silent players in the action.
The Making of Kubrick's 2001 Jerome Agel 1970 Clarke's short story upon which the movie was based is presented together with stills from the film, critical reviews, and notes on its production
Space Piers Bizony 2006 Astronomy.
Discovering Kubrick's Symbolism Nicole M. Berg 2020-07-29 Bringing to light the long-shrouded symbolism and startling spiritual depth that renowned director Stanley Kubrick packed into every detail of his iconic films, this book excavates the subtle ways Kubrick calls attention to universal truths and shocking realities still pervading our society. It cites the master director's use of encoded graphic symbols, signifying light effects, doppelgangers, esoteric color-coding, and framing techniques that communicate Kubrick's underlying topics. Beginning with an exploration of the inspirational themes of his classic science fiction film 2001: A Space Odyssey, including the multilayered meaning of the Monolith, this book traces the themes and symbols encrypted in the films that followed during the director's impressive career. It reveals the oblique methods Kubrick used to underscore a wide range of humanitarian alarms covered in films as diverse as A Clockwork Orange, Barry Lyndon, The Shining, Full Metal Jacket, and Eyes Wide Shut, and the fascinating links these films have to one another. Surprising revelations discovered in Dr. Strangelove, Spartacus, Lolita, and Paths of Glory are also unveiled for the first time.
2061 Arthur Charles Clarke 1989 Centenarian Heywood Floyd, survivor of two encounters with mysterious monoliths, once again confronts Dave Bowman, an independent HAL, and an unseen alien race
The Film and Media Creators' Guide to Music Vasco Hexel 2018-09-28 Music plays an integral role in the experience of film, television, video games, and other media—yet for many directors, producers, and media creators, working with music can be a baffling and intimidating process. The Film and Media Creators’ Guide to Music bridges the gap between musical professionals and the creators of film and other media projects, establishing a shared language while demystifying this collaborative journey. Organized with a modular chapter structure, the book covers fundamental topics including: Why (and when) to use music in a project How to talk about music Licensing existing music Commissioning original music Working with a composer Geared toward emerging and established creators alike, this book takes a practical approach to the process of finding the best music for all forms of moving image. The Film and Media Creators’ Guide to Music offers hands-on advice for media creators, providing readers with the confidence to approach the planning, commissioning, creation, and placement of music in their projects with the awareness, understanding, and vocabulary that will enable them to be better collaborators and empowered storytellers. For students and professionals working across film and media, this book is the essential guide to using music creatively and effectively.
1999: A Space Odyssey John K Balor 2018-08-03 Part of the premise of the online discussion transcribed in this book is how Gerry AndersonÕs television series ÒSpace: 1999Ó can be understood in relation to Stanley KubrickÕs Ò2001: A Space OdysseyÓ by looking at both narratives through the perspective of systems theory. As a result of doing so, an engaged debate concerned with the political and philosophical subtext of both stories developed. This book gives a full account of the debate with summaries of ideas and insights. The book has been developed on an idealistic basis. It is sold at the lowest price the publisher was willing to accept. A free e-book version can be downloaded at www.lulu.com.
Space Exploration on Film Paul Meehan 2022-03-14 Over the course of several decades, scientific fact has overtaken science fiction as humankind's understanding of the universe has expanded. Mirroring this development, the cinematic depictions of space exploration over the last century have evolved from whimsical sci-fi fantasies to more fact-based portrayals. This book chronologically examines 75 films that depict voyages into outer space and offers the historical, cultural, and scientific context of each. These films range from Georges Melies' fantastical A Trip to the Moon to speculative science fiction works such as 2001: A Space Odyssey, Solaris, and Contact, and fact-based accounts of actual space missions as depicted in The Right Stuff, Apollo 13, Salyut 7 and First Man. Each film is analyzed not only in terms of its direction, screenplay, and other cinematic aspects but also its scientific and historical accuracy. The works of acclaimed directors, including Fritz Lang, George Pal, Stanley Kubrick, Andrei Tarkovsky, Robert Wise, Ron Howard, Robert Zemeckis, Ridley Scott, and Christopher Nolan, are accorded special attention for their memorable contributions to this vital and evolving subgenre of science fiction film.
Stanley Kubrick's 2001, a Space Odyssey Alison Castle 2019-09
Hollyweird Science: The Next Generation Kevin R. Grazier 2017-08-02 Informative, entertaining and upbeat, this book continues Grazier and Cass's exploration of how technology, science, and scientists are portrayed in Hollywood productions. Both big and small-screen productions are featured and their science content illuminated—first by the authors and subsequently by a range of experts from science and the film world. Starring roles in this volume are played by, among other things, computers (human and mechanical), artificial intelligences, robots, and spacecraft. Interviews with writers, producers, and directors of acclaimed science-themed films stand side by side with the perspectives of scientists, science fiction authors, and science advisors. The result is a stimulating and informative reading experience for the layperson and professional scientist or engineer alike. The book begins with a foreword by Zack Stentz, who co-wrote X-Men: First Class and Thor, and is currently a writer/producer on CW’s The Flash.
Moonwatcher's Memoir Dan Richter 2020-12-10 New augmented edition of Dan Richter's iconic recounting of the filming of 2001, in which he choreographed and, as Moonwatcher, led the troop of man-apes as they began the epic journey through humanity to star child. Introduction by Sir Arthur C Clarke, contribution form Keir Dullea.
Outer Space and Popular Culture Annette Froehlich 2019-08-01 This book provides detailed insights into how space and popular culture intersect across a broad spectrum of examples, including cinema, music, art, arcade games, cartoons, comics, and advertisements. This is a pertinent topic since the use of space themes differs in different cultural contexts, and these themes can be used to explore various aspects of the human condition and provide a context for social commentary on politically sensitive issues. With the use of space imagery evolving over the past sixty years of the space age, this is a topic ripe for in-depth exploration. The book also discusses the contrasting visions of space from the late 19th and early 20th centuries and the reality of today, and analyzes space vehicles and habitats in popular depictions of space from an engineering perspective, exploring how many of those ideas have actually been implemented in practice, and why or why not (a case of life imitating art and vice versa). As such, it covers a wide array of relevant and timely topics examining intersections between space and popular culture, and offering accounts of space and its effect on culture, language, and storytelling from the southern regions of the world.
Space Odyssey Michael Benson 2019-04-23 The definitive story of the making of 2001: A Space Odyssey, acclaimed today as one of the greatest films ever made, and of director Stanley Kubrick and writer Arthur C. Clarke—“a tremendous explication of a tremendous film….Breathtaking” (The Washington Post). Fifty years ago a strikingly original film had its premiere. Still acclaimed as one of the most remarkable and important motion pictures ever made, 2001: A Space Odyssey depicted the first contacts between humanity and extraterrestrial intelligence. The movie was the product of a singular collaboration between Stanley Kubrick and science fiction visionary Arthur C. Clarke. Fresh off the success of his cold war satire Dr. Strangelove, Kubrick wanted to make the first truly first-rate science fiction film. Drawing from Clarke’s ideas and with one of the author’s short stories as the initial inspiration, their bold vision benefited from pioneering special effects that still look extraordinary today, even in an age of computer-generated images. In Space Odyssey, author, artist, and award-winning filmmaker Michael Benson “delivers expert inside stuff” (San Francisco Chronicle) from his extensive research of Kubrick’s and Clarke’s archives. He has had the cooperation of Kubrick’s widow, Christiane, and interviewed most of the key people still alive who worked on the film. Drawing also from other previously unpublished interviews, Space Odyssey provides a 360-degree view of the film from its genesis to its legacy, including many previously untold stories. And it features dozens of photos from the making of the film, most never previously published. “At last! The dense, intense, detailed, and authoritative saga of the making of the greatest motion picture I’ve ever seen…Michael Benson has done the Cosmos a great service” (Academy Award-winning actor Tom Hanks).
Understanding Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey James Fenwick 2018-04-01 This edited volume seeks to bring to light the impact of the ‘new’ Kubrick studies upon the ‘old’ Kubrick studies and collate together original insights, and textual and interpretative analyses of 2001: A Space Odyssey. By revising the formalist approaches in Kubrick Studies and conflating it with new empirical approaches, we can arrive at a broader understanding of the means and ways in which Kubrick’s methods as a director were developed to create a unique aesthetic creation and a film that changed cinematic language radically. Approaching the 50th anniversary of its release, 2001’s reputation is cemented as one of the greatest and most influential films ever made, regularly appearing in polls of the most important movies. And the film is still years ahead in its design, vision and philosophical structure. Contributions come largely from emerging scholarly voices within Film Studies, bringing new and innovative approaches to a film they share a common passion for.
Spacefarers Christopher Wanjek 2020 What will it take to make humanity a spacefaring species? The usual: good reasons and good planning. Christopher Wanjek explores the practical motivations for striking out into the far reaches of the solar system and the realities of the challenge. And he introduces us to the scientists and entrepreneurs who are already tackling that challenge.
Monthly Catalog of United States Government Publications 2003
The Space Station Decision Howard E. McCurdy 2008-01-16 Comparing the space station decision to earlier decisions to go to the moon and to build the space shuttle, McCurdy shows how public officials responsible for long-term science and technology policy maneuvered in a political system that demanded short-term flexibility.
2001 Adam K. Johnson 2012-05-25 In the last four decades Stanley Kubricks 2001 has been dissected in books and theses from every conceivable angle. Until humanity actually encounters extraterrestrial intelligence, his movie will draw attention to this most tantalising subject. However, what is often overlooked in all of these critical studies is the almost flawless scientific façade constructed by Kubrick, Clarke, Ordway, Lange and the hundreds of engineers and scientists who contributed to the production. Author and engineer Adam Johnson has spent years accumulating information, believed to have been long since destroyed, to create a detailed and unprecedented analysis of the technology envisioned in Kubricks masterpiece. From British designers and model-makers to Soviet astronomers, from Canadian special effects wizards to German artists, from American spacecraft engineers and artificial intelligence scholars to French stylists, this is the Lost Science of 2001.
Project Space Station Brian O'Leary 2017-09-15 It’s happening now—plans are being formulated under the coordination of NASA to launch a permanent, manned space station by the year 1990. Studies surveying user requirements, system attributes, and architectural options have been conducted, and you’re on the top of these far-reaching considerations on the next big step taken within space! Now that the Shuttle and Spacelab are realities, NASA has set sights on a new horizon—a permanent, manned space station in the high frontier. The precedents have been set—Skylab hosted human visits for up to 84 days, and the Soviet’s Salyut was and is a temporary base for cosmonaut crew. The differences are the term and scope of space station living and the accomplishments that can be realized with a permanent site and continuous experimentation within its facilities. Brian O’Leary, writer, astrophysicist, and former astronaut, describes the “tinkermodules” that will be carried to the earth’s orbit to be assembled as a space station. His inside track information also lays the groundwork for fascinating disclosures on: Space station history, NASA’s studies and plans, space careers and human potential, commerce and homesteading in space, odds of a space war, spacelab, space station architecture, space factories and hotels, soviet space station programs, colonies and exploration. Here are issues that will likely bear directly on the space station of the not-so-distant future and an expert’s interpretation of what that future holds. Unique and timely, Project Space Station gives you a distinctive foretaste of a new era in which homesteading asteroids, growing huge silicon crystals in weightless factories—and the possibility of real star wars—will be a way of life. In 1982, NASA undertook the planning of the United States’ next major initiative in space: a manned space station program to be presented for consideration to the Administration and Congress. This painting depicts one possible space station concept based on the earlier Space Platform studiesby TRW Space & Technology Group (Redondo Beach, California) as commissioned by NASA’s Marshall’s Space Fligth Center. The rectangular panels extending to the right and elft of the main spacecraft would provide solar energy. The upward extension is a single radiator. Of the three modules on the main space station, two are manned for habitation and experimentation and the third, unmanned, provides logistics support. A communications antenna extends forward and downward from the spacecraft. (NASA-photo)
The Griffith Observer 1999
olam he-zeh v'olam ha-ba Leonard J. Greenspoon 2017-09-15 Dining on Leviathan. Discoursing with Socrates. Debating the nature of existence in the afterlife. These are among the topics authors address in this wide-ranging account of how Jews have conceptualized the world to come and structured their lives in this world accordingly. Some authorities portrayed the afterlife as an endless round of feasting and drinking of chazerie that would put the fanciest Las Vegas buffets to shame. There were visionaries who mapped out otherworldly climes populated by monstrous creatures. Others, decidedly more staid, saw the world to come as a location where neither food nor wine would be consumed; instead, it would offer the opportunity to bring moral certitude to questionable practices that could not be eradicated in this world. More down to earth are comparisons between Rabbi Akiva and Socrates, and analyses of influential thinkers like Moses Mendelssohn and Emmanuel Levinas. And more practical are discussions of how concepts of the afterlife serve to determine mourning practices, or more broadly, how humans should fashion their lives in the here and now. The chronological range of these chapters also is impressive. The earliest documents discussed are from Apocryphal literature, including apocalypses, that were composed from 400 BCE to 200 CE. There are creative analyses of rabbinic material and documents from the medieval period through the twentieth century. Evolving ritual and liturgical practices bring readers up to the early twenty-first century. Each of the thirteen authors whose works are brought together in this volume shows historical, cultural, and religious sensitivity both to the unique features of these differing manifestations and to the elements that unite them. For the readers of this volume, which is equally rewarding for general audiences and for specialists, the result is a carefully nuanced, creatively balanced exploration of the breadth of Jewish thought and practice concerning some of the most profound and perplexing issues humans face.
Lab Coats in Hollywood David A. Kirby 2013-02-08 How science consultants make movie science plausible, in films ranging from 2001: A Space Odyssey to Finding Nemo. Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey, released in 1968, is perhaps the most scientifically accurate film ever produced. The film presented such a plausible, realistic vision of space flight that many moon hoax proponents believe that Kubrick staged the 1969 moon landing using the same studios and techniques. Kubrick's scientific verisimilitude in 2001 came courtesy of his science consultants—including two former NASA scientists—and the more than sixty-five companies, research organizations, and government agencies that offered technical advice. Although most filmmakers don't consult experts as extensively as Kubrick did, films ranging from A Beautiful Mind and Contact to Finding Nemo and The Hulk have achieved some degree of scientific credibility because of science consultants. In Lab Coats in Hollywood, David Kirby examines the interaction of science and cinema: how science consultants make movie science plausible, how filmmakers negotiate scientific accuracy within production constraints, and how movies affect popular perceptions of science. Drawing on interviews and archival material, Kirby examines such science consulting tasks as fact checking and shaping visual iconography. Kirby finds that cinema can influence science as well: Depictions of science in popular films can promote research agendas, stimulate technological development, and even stir citizens into political action.
2010 Arthur Charles Clarke 1997 To the spaceship Discovery, floating in the silent depths of space since Dave Bowman passed through the alien 'Star Gate', comes Heywood Floyd on a mission of recovery. What he finds near Jupiter is beyond the imaginings of any mere human.
The Making of 2001: A Space Odyssey Stephanie Schwam 2010-07-21 "If 2001 has stirred your emotions, your subconscious, your mythological yearnings, then it has succeeded."--Stanley Kubrick Stanley Kubrick's extraordinary movie 2001: A Space Odyssey was released in 1969. The critics initially disliked it, but the public loved it. And eventually, the film took its rightful place as one of the most innovative, brilliant, and pivotal works of modern cinema. The Making of 2001: A Space Odyssey consists of testimony from Kubrick's collaborators and commentary from critics and historians. This is the most complete book on the film to date--from Stanley Kubrick's first meeting with screenwriter Arthur C. Clarke to Kubrick's exhaustive research to the actual shooting and release of the movie.
Typeset in the Future Dave Addey 2018-12-11 A designer’s deep dive into seven science fiction films, filled with “gloriously esoteric nerdery [and] observations as witty as they are keen” (Wired). In Typeset in the Future, blogger and designer Dave Addey invites sci-fi movie fans on a journey through seven genre-defining classics, discovering how they create compelling visions of the future through typography and design. The book delves deep into 2001: A Space Odyssey, Star Trek: The Motion Picture, Alien, Blade Runner, Total Recall, WALL·E, and Moon, studying the design tricks and inspirations that make each film transcend mere celluloid and become a believable reality. These studies are illustrated by film stills, concept art, type specimens, and ephemera, plus original interviews with Mike Okuda (Star Trek), Paul Verhoeven (Total Recall), and Ralph Eggleston and Craig Foster (Pixar). Typeset in the Future is an obsessively geeky study of how classic sci-fi movies draw us in to their imagined worlds.
2001: A Space Odyssey and Lacanian Psychoanalytic Theory Daniel Bristow 2018-01-18 In 1968, Stanley Kubrick completed and released his magnum opus motion picture 2001: A Space Odyssey; a time that was also tremendously important in the formation of the psychoanalytic theory of Jacques Lacan. Bringing these figures together, Bristow offers a study that goes beyond, as the film did. He extends Lacan’s late topological insights, delves into conceptualisations of desire, in G. W. F. Hegel, Alexandre Kojève, and Lacan himself, and deals with the major themes of cuts (filmic and psychoanalytic); space; silence; surreality; and ‘das Ding’, in relation to the movie’s enigmatic monolith. This book is a tour de force of psychoanalytic theory and space odyssey that will appeal to academics and practitioners of psychoanalysis and film studies, as well as to any fan of Kubrick’s work.
3001 The Final Odyssey Arthur Charles Clarke 1999-10 It began four million years ago with a gleaming black monolith - an inexplicable apparition that ignited the spark of human consciousness transforming ape into man.

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