Northrop F-5 Tiger II Fighter Free Aircraft Paper Model Download

Northrop F-5 Tiger II Fighter Free Aircraft Paper Model Download

SHARE

Northrop F-5 Tiger II Fighter Free Aircraft Paper Model DownloadThis aircraft paper model is a very simple Northrop F-5 Tiger II , a part of a family of widely used light supersonic fighter aircraft, the papercraft was created by Nagasaki. The F-5 started life as a privately-funded light fighter program by Northrop in the 1950s. The design team wrapped a small and highly aerodynamic fighter around two compact and high thrust-to-weight ratio General Electric J85 engines, focusing on leading edge performance and low cost of maintenance. Armed with twin 20 mm cannons and missiles for air-to-air combat, the aircraft was also a capable ground attack platform. The first-generation F-5A entered service in the early 1960s. During the Cold War, over 800 were produced through 1972 for U.S. allies. While the USAF had no acknowledged need for a light fighter, it did procure roughly 1,200 supersonic trainer aircraft that were an F-5 derivative, the Northrop T-38 Talon. The T-38 remains in active service as the primary advanced trainer of the USAF.

As a result of winning the International Fighter Aircraft competition in 1970, a program aimed at providing effective low cost fighters to American allies, Northrop introduced the second-generation F-5E Tiger II in 1972. This upgrade included more powerful engines, higher fuel capacity, greater wing area and improved leading edge extensions for better turn rate, optional air to air refueling, and improved avionics including air-to-air radar. Though primarily used by American allies, it also served in U.S. military aviation as a training and aggressor aircraft. A total of 1,400 Tiger II versions were built, production came to an end in 1987.

The F-5 was also developed into a dedicated reconnaissance version, the RF-5 Tigereye. The F-5 also served as a starting point for a series of design studies which resulted in the twin-tailed Northrop YF-17 and the F/A-18 series of carrier-based fighters. The Northrop F-20 Tigershark was an advanced version of the F-5E that did not find a market. The F-5N/F variants remain in service with the United States Navy and United States Marine Corps as an adversary trainer.

In 1970, Northrop won the International Fighter Aircraft (IFA) competition to replace the F-5A, with better air-to-air performance against aircraft like the Soviet MiG-21. The resultant aircraft, initially known as F-5A-21, subsequently became the F-5E. It had more powerful (5,000 lbf) General Electric J85-21 engines, and had a lengthened and enlarged fuselage, accommodating more fuel. Its wings were fitted with enlarged leading edge extensions, giving an increased wing area and improved maneuverability. The aircraft's avionics were more sophisticated, crucially including a radar. It retained the gun armament of two M39 cannon, one on either side of the nose of the F-5A. Various specific avionics fits could be accommodated at customer request, including an inertial navigation system, TACAN and ECM equipment.

The first F-5E flew on 11 August 1972. A two-seat combat-capable trainer, the F-5F, was offered, first flying on 25 September 1974, with a new, longer nose, which, unlike the F-5B that did not mount a gun, allowed it to retain a single M39 cannon, albeit with a reduced ammunition capacity. The two-seater was equipped with the Emerson AN/APQ-157 radar, which is a derivative of the AN/APQ-153 radar, with dual control and display systems to accommodate the two-men crew, and the radar has the same range of AN/APQ-153, around 10 nmi.

A reconnaissance version, the RF-5E Tigereye, with a sensor package in the nose displacing the radar and one cannon, was also offered.

The F-5E eventually received the official name Tiger II; 792 F-5Es, 146 F-5Fs and 12 RF-5Es were eventually built by Northrop. More were built under license overseas: 91 F-5Es and -Fs in Switzerland, 68 by Korean Air in South Korea, and 308 in Taiwan. The F-5 proved to be a successful combat aircraft for U.S. allies, but had no combat service with the U.S. Air Force. The F-5E evolved into the single-engine F-5G, which was rebranded the F-20 Tigershark. It lost out on export sales to the F-16 in the 1980s.

The F-5E experienced numerous upgrades in its service life, with the most significant one being adopting a new planar array radar, Emerson AN/APQ-159 with a range of 20 nmi to replace the original AN/APQ-153. Similar radar upgrades were also proposed for F-5F, with the derivative of AN/APQ-159, the AN/APQ-167, to replace the AN/APQ-157, but that was cancelled. The latest radar upgrade included the Emerson AN/APG-69, which was the successor of AN/APQ-159, incorporating mapping capability. However, most nations chose not to upgrade for financial reasons, and the radar saw very little service in USAF aggressor squadrons and Swiss air force.

Various F-5 versions remain in service with many nations. Singapore has approximately 49 modernized and re-designated F-5S (single-seat) and F-5T (two-seat) aircraft. Upgrades include new FIAR Grifo-F X-band radar from Galileo Avionica (similar in performance to the AN/APG-69), updated cockpits with multi-function displays, and compatibility with the AIM-120 AMRAAM and Rafael Python air-to-air missiles.

One NASA F-5E was given a modified fuselage shape for its employment in the Shaped Sonic Boom Demonstration program carried out by DARPA. It is preserved in the Valiant Air Command Warbird Museum at Titusville, Florida.

The Royal Thai Air Force (RTAF) had their F-5s undergo an entensive upgrade program, resulting in the aircraft re-designated as F-5T Tigris. They are armed with Python III and 4 missiles; and equipped with the Dash helmet-mounted cueing system.

Similar programs have been carried out in Chile and Brazil with the help of Elbit. The Chilean upgrade, called the F-5 Tiger III Plus, incorporated a new Elta EL/M-2032 radar and other improvements. The Brazilian program, re-designated as F-5M, adds a new Grifo-F radar along with several avionics and cockpit refurbishments, including the Dash helmet. The F-5M has been equipped with new weapon systems such as the Beyond Visual Range Derby missile, Python IV short-range air-to-air missile, and several other weapons. [Source: wiki]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Length: 47 ft 4¾ in (14.45 m)
  • Wingspan: 26 ft 8 in (8.13 m)
  • Height: 13 ft 4½ in (4.08 m)
  • Wing area: 186 ft² (17.28 m²)
  • Airfoil: NACA 65A004.8 root, NACA 64A004.8 tip
  • Empty weight: 9,558 lb (4,349 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 15,745 lb (7,157 kg)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 24,722 lb (11,214 kg)
  • Powerplant: 2 × General Electric J85-GE-21B turbojet
    • Dry thrust: 3,500 lbf (15.5 kN) each
    • Thrust with afterburner: 5,000 lbf (22.2 kN) each
  • * Zero-lift drag coefficient: 0.0200
  • Drag area: 3.4 ft² (0.32 m²)
  • Aspect ratio: 3.86
  • Internal fuel: 677 U.S. gal (2,563 L)
  • External fuel: 275 U.S. gal (1,040 L) per tank in up to 3 tanks

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 917 kn (Mach 1.6, 1,060 mph, 1,700 km/h)
  • Range: 760 nmi (870 mi, 1,405 km)
  • Ferry range: 2,010 nmi (2,310 mi, 3,700 km)
  • Service ceiling: 51,800 ft (15,800 m)
  • Rate of climb: 34,400 ft/min (175 m/s)
  • Lift-to-drag ratio: 10.0

Armament

  • Guns: 2× 20 mm (0.787 in) M39A2 Revolver cannons in the nose, 280 rounds/gun
  • Hardpoints: 7 total (only pylon stations 3, 4 and 5 are wet-plumbed): 2× wing-tip AAM launch rails, 4× under-wing & 1× under-fuselage pylon stations with a capacity of 7,000 pounds (3,200 kg) and provisions to carry combinations of:
    • Rockets:
      • 2× LAU-61/LAU-68 rocket pods (each with 19× /7× Hydra 70 mm rockets, respectively); or
      • 2× LAU-5003 rocket pods (each with 19× CRV7 70 mm rockets); or
      • 2× LAU-10 rocket pods (each with 4× Zuni 127 mm rockets); or
      • 2× Matra rocket pods (each with 18× SNEB 68 mm rockets)
    • Missiles:
      • 4× AIM-9 Sidewinders or 4× AIM-120 AMRAAM air-to-air missile
      • 2× AGM-65 Maverick air-to-surface missiles
      • AA-8 Aphid, AA-10 Alamo, AA-11 Archer and other Russian/Chinese AAMs
    • Bombs: A variety of air-to-ground ordnance such as the Mark 80 series of unguided bombs (including 3 kg and 14 kg practice bombs), CBU-24/49/52/58 cluster bomb munitions, napalm bomb canisters and M129 Leaflet bomb, and laser-guided bombs of Paveway family.
    • Other:
      • up to 3× 150/275 U.S. gallon Sargent Fletcher drop tanks for ferry flight or extended range/loitering time.
      • 2× GPU-5/A 30mm cannon pods

You can download the paper model here: Northrop F-5 Tiger II Fighter Free Aircraft Paper Model Download

NO COMMENTS

LEAVE A REPLY